View Full Version : Old Fashioned Fountain Pen


Have Fun
28-02-08, 01:22 PM
As I looked at the number of plastic pens on my desk a thought occured to me that an old fashioned refillable fountain pen & clutch pencil are in fact a lot greener solution than the throwaway plastic varieties we now use.

Imagine how much less plastic there would be to dispose of if they made a come back.

The revolution could start here guys.

Apart from that my handwriting always looked better when I used a fountain pen.

Darth Vader
28-02-08, 01:31 PM
I have never been able to really write with a biro. I still have some fountain pens. However I prefer the little bellows to suck up the ink rather than cartridges.

Cheers,

DV

Have Fun
28-02-08, 01:37 PM
I agree I'll have to hunt around my drawers for some

Yeah the cartridges would have to be refillable & reusable to be green

Darth Vader
28-02-08, 01:46 PM
Yup all my fountain pens are Parkers. I remember that a snooty Schaffer had a proboscis that sucked up the ink. The adverts showed some ponce with white gloves filling the pen.

But a Parker with a cartridge is just not the same. I like the little side lever that compresses the tube to suck up the ink. I used to be able to change inks easily in class from blue, royal blue, blue-black and black. The brighter colours were for girls...........


Cheers,

DV

palpnorte
28-02-08, 01:50 PM
Pelikan M800, Sailor blue ink. There is no finer writing experience.

concrete
28-02-08, 02:05 PM
I have never been able to really write with a biro. I still have some fountain pens. However I prefer the little bellows to suck up the ink rather than cartridges.

Cheers,

DV

Where do you get those bellows? I have a really nice old wooden pen of my grandfather's but no way to use it.

Have Fun
28-02-08, 02:21 PM
Here you go Concrete this guy tells it as it is

http://www.penmuseum.co.uk/index.html

vuk
28-02-08, 02:24 PM
Pelikan M800, Sailor blue ink. There is no finer writing experience.

good choice. the brass nibs of pelican are the best for writing (as opposed to showing off a la mont blanc).

vuk.

palpnorte
28-02-08, 02:37 PM
Montblanc make nice enough pens, but indeed - you are paying for the boutiques, the adverts and Johnny Depp's modeling fees.

Pelikan's interchangeable nibs (e.g. a pen from the 40's will take an 80's nib), restrained design and piston filling system make them unbeatable, IMO .

palp

vuk
28-02-08, 02:44 PM
palp.

mont blanc nibs are too stiff. it all feels like writing with a roller-ball, which is what the rich inept klutzes want. a flexing nib gives you more artistic control, but is a disaster in the wrong hands. i also have this parker which i have taken a fetish picture of:

http://photo.net/equipment/pentax/istds/parker_gold.jpg

vuk.

Virtual Dynamics
28-02-08, 02:53 PM
I also own the Pelikan 800 and concur with observations.

I do use gel ink for my daily writing and find it an acceptable compromise given their convenience and not having to worry about losing them during normal daily activities around the office.

The refills I use fit any Parker Style Pen , are 1.0 mm from the local Dollar Store and I get a two pack for a buck.

Smooth flowing

concrete
29-02-08, 01:08 AM
Here you go Concrete this guy tells it as it is

http://www.penmuseum.co.uk/index.html

Excellent, thanks! Might send it away and get it all refitted, I've no idea how usable it is.

andy831
29-02-08, 01:44 AM
A Pelikan, a Waterman or a Parker for me dependant on whether I want Blue, Green or Red ink.

hifi_dave
29-02-08, 01:54 AM
I've been using a Parker Duofold Centennial for Donkey's years now. It's reserved for filling in the columns in my business books with Parker black ink and somehow it looks so much neater than doing the same with a Biro, even a good one.:)

blakeaudio
29-02-08, 03:14 AM
i have a dunhill sidecar and a mont blanc. the dunhill certainly has a softer nib and is generally more comfortable to write with, however it is nice to alternate. at work besides a keybord, everything i write is with a fountain pen.

ian r
29-02-08, 05:12 AM
As this is a thread inspired by green thinking and the idea of not creating non biodegradable rubbish I do not think references to using throw away cartridges should go unoticed. My wife found a Shaeffer pen ......is there a white dot range ..... besides the law courts in Edinburgh some 20 years ago it had a cartridge in it ....... it still has the same cartridge in it as we refill it from a ancient HP cartridge refiller that I now keep my ink in ... drip free and I believe the cartridge will last longer than those old bladdery things on my other pens ...... all Parkers and Swanns which were repaired at a ridiculous price in Edinburgh pen shop ..... all needed new scrotums fitted ...

so cartridges OK if refilled not if thrown away...... 'can I have a badge now'

Have Fun
29-02-08, 07:14 AM
Now that could be interesting If I could use the same method

what is the hp refillable bit ? & is it still available?

palpnorte
29-02-08, 11:40 AM
Just ask for a blunt syringe at the chemists - take care to explain why you want it, and then drink in the relieved yet quizzical look.

Refilling cartridges works well enough, but you will miss out on the beneficial effects of flushing ink through the nib and section. You can do this by putting it in your mouth and huffing in and out, risking the interesting effects of an inky mouthwash, or alternately purchase the cartridge converter that will undoubtedly be available for your pen at :

The Writing Desk (http://www.thewritingdesk.co.uk/spares.php)

who also supply over 150 colours of ink.

When I was young it was blue when you were learning, blue black or black when you'd learned, and then anything else for writing peculiar letters to the Radio Times. Happily this is no longer the case. One of my favourites is Noodler's 'El Lawrence' (http://www.thewritingdesk.co.uk/noodlers/noodlers.php), an intriguing little American ink which is a sort of greasy dark green verging on black, a bit like dirty engine oil.

palp

guybat
29-02-08, 11:42 AM
Thanks chaps. This thread has wasted half my day. I'm now set on a Pelikan of my very own.

palpnorte
29-02-08, 11:48 AM
But which one? (I'm getting a bit evangelical, I think)

If you go for a Pelikan, then consider getting it from Niche Pens (http://www.pelikanpens.co.uk/index.htm). Ray is a very nice guy, and they are the cheapest I've found in the UK (and will let you do things like home dem the nibs!)

palp

andrew d
29-02-08, 11:52 AM
Unless you want to pay a lot of cash you cann't beat a Parker 51. Try the bay or antiquey places

guybat
29-02-08, 11:55 AM
After faffing around on The Fountain Pen Network (there just had to be a pen-geek forum) Pelikans seemed the stand out choice, though I quite like the neo-Bauhaus minimalism of the Lamy 2000.

May well just go for the M150 or 200 - I don't think I need a gold nib,and I like fairly small and plain pens. I've got an old Rotring Art Pen I've used for years, but it's pretty leaky these days.

Some of the Sailor pens on the Writing Desk site look nice too though. What's your recommendation?

Don't like the look of the Parkers - I know they're classics, but that streamlined 50s look just doesn't cut it for me.

palpnorte
29-02-08, 12:02 PM
The man speaks the truth. The '51' is spectacular, and the top candidate for being the best pen ever - should you get a good example. If you are thinking of collecting pens, then the '51' should be your touchstone. With respect though, there's a lot of crap on Ebay and (particularly in the UK , where they are somewhat rarer) you need to know what you are at. If you are prepared to spend 150 or so, then you can get guaranteed examples from places like the Battersea Pen Home (http://www.penhome.co.uk/index.htm).

palp

guybat
29-02-08, 12:07 PM
Sorry, just had a look through their selection and I just really don't like the way they look. It has to be plain black for starters.

Have Fun
29-02-08, 12:08 PM
ditto with the Pelikan search

The el cheapo Pelikano can use an ink convertor so around 20 inclusive bottle of ink

still considering a 200 though near 50 with ink

& yes Niche Pens are cheapest & affable .. Ray just emailed me with the info on the Pelikano not bad for Friday 7.30pm

Thanks to all for suggestions

Damas
29-02-08, 12:30 PM
I've been using a Waterman Ideal for the past 16 years, a present for my 21st. If I were to buy another pen, only a Parker Duofold would be on my list.

ian r
29-02-08, 12:35 PM
Now that could be interesting If I could use the same method

what is the hp refillable bit ? & is it still available?

Its ancient Inkjet refill item left over from when I bought an early HP Inkjet at 800 along with my first Apple in 1989.

Its bellowed squeezy plastic bottle with a blunt and angled syringe on it .... as someone ses a blunt syringe will do the same thing ... but the bottles with syringes also allow one to store ink in ....

So I dont know if inkjet refills have anything like this old kit in anymore

palpnorte
29-02-08, 01:02 PM
The Lamy 2000 is another superb pen. They are beautifully made (I guarantee you will challenge pals in a very sad way to see if they can find where the join in the barrel for the piston is), but the textured matte makrolon (weird 60's glass fibre derivative used in ski goggles) barrel and low key steel clip have an almost anti-bling quality to them.

Their nib is gold, but where another manufacturer might choose to accentuate this, Lamy plate it with platinum so it won't stand out. Lamy also provide legendary after sales care,. Only today, I sent my 18 mth old 2000 back to Heidelberg because I've decided that I think I want an F nib rather than M. When I inquired about this, a nice Lamy lady said to send it along, and added 'of course, this service will be without charge'. It is a lot of pen for 100.

On the other hand, Pelikan have Naim-like upgradeability. If I were buying my first, I think I might look at something from the M215 range. Unusually for Pelikan, the body of the pen is metal to enable the geometric enameling. A by product of this is a satisfying weight that you do not get in the rest of the 200 range. The nib is plain steel, but this can be upgraded later to a gold/rhodium number if you want. As I'm sure you realise, the tip you write with is actually some patented alloy, or a metal like ruthenium, and the gold which forms the rest of the nib giving just crowd pleasing bling, and a slight but interesting flexibility. They're really nice pens.

palp

The 50s look of the Parker '51' is the more amazing as it was designed in the 30s - far more Bauhaus than the Lamy, really - esp. as Moholy-Nagy did the original ads!

Have Fun
29-02-08, 01:23 PM
Well this is proving interesting

I just stumbled across the Sailor Caligraphy & Brush pens on the Writing Desk site & ordered them .. as I tend to use pens for sketching as well as writing they both should be useful but I'm really anxious now to get the brush nib pen in my mit .. this pen type I've been wanting for years .. can't wait to try it.

Still considering other pens as well & that Lamy 2000 certainly looks the ideal pen shape to me.

palpnorte
29-02-08, 01:27 PM
Be careful. It's a very addictive hobby:)

guybat
29-02-08, 01:50 PM
The Lamy 2000 is probably a bit 70's for now. The Pelikan M215 looks really nice - I like the idea of a metal barrel, and a slightly heavier weight, though I'd still like a totally black pen, rather than the decorated M215.

Niche pens got back to me, and recommend an M200 for starters, but predicted I'd end up with an M600 or similar - maybe I should save money and go straight for one of those?

Palp - interesting about the gold v steel nibs - didn't realise they're basically functionally the same.

bluefish
01-03-08, 04:50 AM
Personally I've always liked Cross pens. I use the Century II Classic fountain pen with a broad nib.
http://www.cross.com/catalog/productlisting.aspx?cat_name=Fountain+Pens&sort=cy_list_price+desc&page=3

I've also got a good desk set of biro and pencil that are a lot more environmentally friendly than bic biro. It's not the bics you use, its the ones you accumulate and eventually throw away if you don't keep avoiding having any at all.

guybat
01-03-08, 08:17 AM
Went into an extremely poncerama pen shop in Burlington Arcade and tried out some pens. The Pelikans were nice but felt very light. Surprised I needed a broad nib - always thought I'd be medium/light. Tried a Parker Sonnet that felt great - small but much heavier than the Pelikans, but didn't like the cheapo ink reservoir thingy, preferred the Pelikan method. The parkwrs seem to have dodgy rep for drying up too.

So now maybe the heavier metal-barrelled Pelikan M215, which they didn't have - but that doesn't have a gold nib... This is worse than hi-fi.

dan m
01-03-08, 08:20 AM
I have this - a nice combination of old and new:

http://www.jetpens.com/images/raymay_brft220_b.jpg

The barrel is maple.

auric
01-03-08, 08:45 AM
I have not used a real fountain pen for ages and this thread has got my juices going and started me thinking about using one for every day use. The last one I purchased was back in 1982 (http://www.lamy.com/the_company/product_innovation/design/history/1982_lamy_white_pen/index_eng.html) , I know white looks a bit OTT but back then it matched my white rubber covered Filofax and white rubber Swatch Watch. Back then I had way more money than taste whereas now more taste than money is the order of the day.

ErikL
01-03-08, 09:49 AM
I have the Lamy AL-Star in light blue.

http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/yhst-7749489752851_1987_14021566

palpnorte
01-03-08, 10:01 AM
guybat - that'll be Penfriend, I imagine. Very nice people working in there, but *eyewatering* prices for secondhand pens. 200+ for a pretty average Parker '51' if you're lucky. And apart from perhaps three (?) sorts of Pelikan nib, every pen you want to try just has medium ..... you would think that physical pen shops might realise that the only thing that might make it worthwhile buying from them is that you can try the pens. Apparently not. It is one of those rare cases where in every respect buying online is better. Bigger choice, better prices & superior service.

I also would say not to be too influenced by the weight thing. Some part of us equates heaviness with quality, but Pelikans (like a lot of proper pens) are deliberately designed to have negligible weight. When you do serious writing, you want the pen to become an extension of the hand so that you can write for hours without having to put the pen down for a cup of tea and a rest. It is not costly to make pens heavy, remember. Think rather vicuna suits and bespoke clothes. The 215 range is only a few grammes heavier than the 200 range, and is actually a very subtle distinction. A lot of Pelikan's outrageously more expensive pens are lighter.

palp

guybat
01-03-08, 10:16 AM
Weight point taken Palp. The size of the Sonnet was fine, so I'd be happy with an M200, though I've seen an M250 for 70 online with the gold nib - worth getting?

Have Fun
01-03-08, 10:37 AM
Weight point taken Palp. The size of the Sonnet was fine, so I'd be happy with an M200, though I've seen an M250 for 70 online with the gold nib - worth getting?

We're considering the same pen then & I'm almost there

Alternative is M200 with an M400 nib from Niche Pens for 80 (nib for the 400 is 40-52 depending where you shop & the M200 is 45 standard steel nib. The only advantage with buying from Niche is the 28 day nib exchange
(I'm thinking of the 0B or BB as my preferred nib size) & The Writing Desk makes no mention of nib exchange

The Other Nagging Alternative for me is the Lamy Studio 57 35 which has a greater range of nib sizes compared to the Pelikan 200 50 with ink convertor nibs F M B .. bit of conflict with info on the nib types ~ Lamy website says steel / The writing desk says 14 c gold

Truth be told its all an indulgence for the amount of pure writing I do these days .. but I do feel a novel coming on (well short story anyway ~ about a bloke buying a pen to write a novel with)

palpnorte
01-03-08, 11:31 AM
I wouldn't get hung up on the gold thing, either. As I said before, the bit you actually write with is an alloy which will have a Col. Sanders - stylee uniqueness depending on the manufacturer. Gold (and the better nibs are 14kt, not 18 or 21 - which are a bit too bendy for an ideal nib and there for the easily impressed - and Pelikan do it too - it's partly to do with what the U.S. will recognise as gold) does have a slightly different feel to it, because of the bendiness. Not necessarily better, just different. Certainly nothing to do with smoothness, which again is not (IMO) what you should be after. A 14 Parker Frontier from Smiths will be smoother than any of the pens we are discussing, but being incredibly smooth (just a product of the way the nib is ground, and no big deal) tends to make your writing go all over the place, because friction does not provide a check. What (again, IMO) you should be after is smoothness combined with feedback, which is the incredibly subtle sensation which provides the character of a good pen, and is of infinite variety. Far more difficult to achieve in a satisfactory manner.

The nice thing about the 215 is that in Pelikan's range, it is sort of apart and a thing all on its own. If you do get the urge to buy more pens, you will never feel you have compromised or bought a cheaper version of something else (like maybe the M200, and definitely the M180). The 215 nib (which is steel) is only available in 3 grades (F, M, B) unlike the droves of alternatives in the Souveran line. However, if you should want to ring the changes, you can buy more nibs later on ( the Souveran nibs all fit).

If you go for the 215, then you are faced with the choice of the three models - the rings (probably the most stylish) the blue pinstripe (restrained but interesting) or the rhombus pattern, which I reckon has an intriguing whiff of Princess Margaret. I've got the first two and the third is on my list.

Have Fun - IMO Lamy is a great make, and the Studio is a really nice pen. The gold nib is only available on the 72 palladium version though. All the other nibs are standard Lamy, which The Writing Desk knocks out at 3.60 each, so you can experiment. A real bargain, I think. I've got two Studios and six Safaris, and they all share the same nibs (but even these are slightly different, because of course they are hand finished).

palp

Mick P
01-03-08, 11:52 AM
Chaps

I have over 55 vintage pens and 20 years experience of collecting them.

The best pens are from the 1950's and most collectors regard the Parker 51 as being the most practical to use on a daily basis.

I have 6 of them and they rarely go wrong, have good size ink resevior and never leak.

Here is a useful site

http://penhome.co.uk/Parker%2051.htm

Regards

Mick

palpnorte
01-03-08, 11:57 AM
Glad that you agree with me, Mick.

Mick P
01-03-08, 12:00 PM
Palpnorte

People with knowledge nearly always agree.

Regards

Mick

cubastreet
01-03-08, 01:53 PM
I just use a nib on a handle that I dunk into the ink.
I like the way the lines vary with the amount of ink in the nib.
And they are very cheap.

Have Fun
01-03-08, 04:27 PM
Palp thanks for the advice it's much appreciated

I had not looked at the nib prices & at that price range The Studio looks like a good stepping stone for me to try out a variety of nib sizes & get a feel for a fountain pen again ( I appreciate that the Lamy are broader but it will still give a good indication) .. though I have a sneaky suspicion that the brush nib pen is the one I'll put to most use .. I'll see after a few weeks & if arthritis flares up.

Do you perhaps have any knowledge of large lead pencils? The Lamy Scribbler is calling me & looks almost unique but I am not aware of other equivalent 3.5 lead makes.

Thanks

kuma
01-03-08, 07:14 PM
Pelikan M800, Sailor blue ink. There is no finer writing experience.
Except that I can't deal with a manual pump. ( M 600 )
I've been using a Dunhill AD2000 (http://www.pensinasia.com/ad2000_carbon_fibre_fp_-_alfred_dunhill.htm) which takes a cartridge as well. ( I know it's not quite *old-fashioned* )

Artioneer
01-03-08, 07:42 PM
If any of the fancy writer's prefer value for money I would suggest that you to consider the Hero '329's' at a couple of pounds each, after a run in period they are very nice.

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h18/Ray_Tube/12hero329a.jpg

The latest models.
http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h18/Ray_Tube/329new.jpg

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h18/Ray_Tube/329new1.jpg

vuk
01-03-08, 08:08 PM
art.

i have one of those (an old one mind you, but looks identical) and the nib is simply brutal. are they any better now?

vuk.

kuma
01-03-08, 08:13 PM
Are they steel nibs?

Artioneer
01-03-08, 08:32 PM
I have one of those (an old one mind you, but looks identical) and the nib is simply brutal. are they any better now?

IME no fountain pen gives it's best until it's had a good running in period and these Hero 329's require more than most, after this absolutely necessary bedding in thingey they can perform very well.

I'm expecting a delivery imminently so if you wish to try one (foc of course) send details of your preferred color to : artioneer (at) yahoo dot com

vuk
01-03-08, 08:54 PM
thanks art. that's very kind of you. i can't email from this particular machine, but will send you a message tomorrow when i'll have access to the capable machine.

vuk.

palpnorte
03-03-08, 11:52 AM
Have Fun - I'm not really up on those Lamy Scribblers from personal experience, but I do understand that they are well thought of and pretty much iconic. Swiss architects peering through heavy hornrims quickly outlining their modernist vision of an Italian cutlery manufacturer's on-site health facility with confident broad strokes sort of a thing. I'd go for it, if I were you.

Kuma - it's not really a question of 'old fashioned' (cartridges have been on the go in some form since the 1890s and are an older technology than the piston), more that the vacuum method, or Parker 51-style squeezy job is just demonstrably the better system.

I have loads of cartridge or cartridge/converter pens, and they all eventually suffer from very similar problems, which (and I don't know about you - but they plagued my secondary school fountain pen career) are very annoying. You get to the second page of your essay and then the writing all fades out and goes pale, so you have to open the pen and squeeze the cartridge, move the plunger or shake the pen in the aisle between the desks, all the while hoping you don't bang it on something. A Pelikan would be incapable of this behaviour.

Modern Parkers are the absolute worst for this and don't seem to have changed since I got my Parker 45 in 1963 (engraved by doting parents). This is because either the surface tension on the inside of the polythene of the cartridge has stopped the ink from moving towards the feed, or the seal at the edge of the cartridge or cartridge converter is not quite right, and you get ink starvation. This week I bought a brand new Parker 100, and it's still the ****ing same. You would think I should have learned by now. Lamy are the exception to this rule and have an innovative design which has made the keeper (the arrangement of rows of thin fins inside the section (the bit you pinch between your fingers)) over an inch long. This means that there is a huge amount of ink always kept in constant readiness, and any negative vagaries of the cartridge or cartridge/converter are stomped on and laughed at. Superb design, and an extension of the ground broken by the '51', which the modern Parker (now, sadly just a division of Sanford Rubbermaid, and who could have confidence in a company with a name like that?) has of late ignored. Parker make 'Shrek ' pens now - do I need I say any more?

And in spite of all my anti-cartridge propaganda, Kuma, I am extremely jealous of your Dunhill.In spite of what one might imagine, Dunhill and Cartier make absolutely fabulous pens (and I think that Dunhill amazingly make their own nibs). When I am rich, I want a Sidecar, - is that what you've got?

(on a mission) palp

kasperhauser
03-03-08, 12:13 PM
I have the Lamy AL-Star in light blue.

I have the green version.

Have Fun
03-03-08, 05:45 PM
Have Fun - I'm not really up on those Lamy Scribblers from personal experience, but I do understand that they are well thought of and pretty much iconic. Swiss architects peering through heavy hornrims quickly outlining their modernist vision of an Italian cutlery manufacturer's on-site health facility with confident broad strokes sort of a thing. I'd go for it, if I were you. palp

Well I won a cheap new Lamy Studio on E bay & will order extra nibs when it arrives along with the Scribbler & its leads.

If this is the pencil I'm thinking of (I think it is) then an old boss of mine used to have one & produced some wonderful sketches with it .. I used to nick it every time he went out of the office as I loved it, but I have never come across it since then .. all I remember of it is that it was stubby & black .. instead of holding it like a normal pen the boss man often held it as you would pick up a matchstick / paper clip.

I'm tracking down suitable sharpeners for it as well .. looks like Faber Castell do one.

(NB the Swiss architect with the thick specs produced some pretty awful spidery sketch drawings .. but I take your point.)

dan m
03-03-08, 08:10 PM
I have the Lamy AL-Star in light blue.

http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/yhst-7749489752851_1987_14021566

I wore out my black Safari - the lid failed to close after a number of years. Is the Al version any better in that regard than the plastic one?

Dan

kuma
03-03-08, 11:36 PM
Kuma - it's not really a question of 'old fashioned' (cartridges have been on the go in some form since the 1890s and are an older technology than the piston), more that the vacuum method, or Parker 51-style squeezy job is just demonstrably the better system.

palpnorte,

I've never owned a Parker fountain pen as the new ones seem to be over the top and it doens't write that well.
I had an opportunity to buy a vintage Parker, but one look at the pump thingy, it doesn't hold much ink there.

The reason I prefer the cartridge type ( altho, I used to mix the just the right of shade green for the converter type cartridge ) is that they all seem to run out the ink too quickly.
A cartridge is easy to change even in the middle of a meeting.

I've been using a fountaing pen since when I was about 6 and only used a cartridge type.

A Pelikan I used before the AD2000 was a major PITA and eventually I gave up.

My beloved Sailer was beyond repair ( I got this in Japan )

This week I bought a brand new Parker 100, and it's still the ****ing same. You would think I should have learned by now. Lamy are the exception to this rule and have an innovative design which has made the keeper (the arrangement of rows of thin fins inside the section (the bit you pinch between your fingers)) over an inch long. This means that there is a huge amount of ink always kept in constant readiness, and any negative vagaries of the cartridge or cartridge/converter are stomped on and laughed at. Superb design, and an extension of the ground broken by the '51', which the modern Parker (now, sadly just a division of Sanford Rubbermaid, and who could have confidence in a company with a name like that?) has of late ignored. Parker make 'Shrek ' pens now - do I need I say any more?
Lamy actually makes very nice pens.
Altho, my absolute favourite was the *fish* ball pen.
Very ergonomic and clever design. My mom liked it so much that I've given it away and realised later it's no longer made.

And in spite of all my anti-cartridge propaganda, Kuma, I am extremely jealous of your Dunhill.In spite of what one might imagine, Dunhill and Cartier make absolutely fabulous pens (and I think that Dunhill amazingly make their own nibs).

That is surprising. I thought that their OEM was Montblanc.
I prefer the way the AD2000 writes.
I've found out about it when I stopped by at a local Dunhill store to pick up my father's lighter.

It's been retipped once and the cap has been replaced since I dropped it on the floor accidentally. :x

But this is probably the last fountain pen for me.

p.s. Got any good recommendation of a deep green ink for Pilot/Namiki pens?

guybat
04-03-08, 12:48 AM
Noodler Inks (see, I'm an expert after 2 days!) highly recommended, and if you're US based, easy to source:

http://www.noodlersink.com/samples.html

http://www.thewritingdesk.co.uk/noodlers/noodlers.php

matt j
04-03-08, 04:54 AM
fountain pens are no good for leftys, we have to use biros

vuk
04-03-08, 06:37 AM
fountain pens are no good for leftys, we have to use biros

over in canada (quebec, in particular), the nuns would have whipped that sinister devil habit out of you in grade school.


vuk.

Have Fun
04-03-08, 07:04 AM
over in canada (quebec, in particular), the nuns would have whipped that sinister devil habit out of you in grade school.


vuk.

Bloody left handed Protestants

..

I've seen a few nibs offered designed for Left handers btw

guybat
04-03-08, 07:34 AM
I'm left handed, and can use any old right handed nib no problems at all.

Just been to Penfriends in Bush House Arcade, which is a lovely old-fashioned shop, much nicer than the blingy 'We don't stock Pelikans, there's no demand' Pen Shops.

Gold Pelikan fine nibs felt loads better than the steel ones, no idea why. But it's bumped up the price a wee bit. Damn.

palpnorte
04-03-08, 11:57 AM
Kuma - I think you're probably right about Dunhill / Montblanc and their nibs ... I may have been thinking of Yard-O-Led - but anyway, the thrust of what I was trying to say is that Dunhill and Cartier are not just brand-stretching nonsense like Bentley/Ducatti/ and Smart(!?) but just very good pens.

For a dark green suitable for Namiki/Pilot (which in my experience are quite dry writers) I 'm very fond of Montblanc's Racing Green, which is not British Racing Green as you would imagine, but the colour used by Jaguar quite early on - almost black with a khaki/olive tone. It's very individual, and a well thought out colour. Apart from that, there's Noodler's Squeteague, which is a sort of dingy distressed teal, or maybe Diamine Umber. The last two you can get from The Writing Desk, and the Montblanc stuff from Montblanc shops or department stores.

palp

palpnorte
04-03-08, 12:01 PM
guybat - I thought you had decided on broad? Oh well, if it's gold you fancy, you're going to have to flash the cash. From Niche Pens, you could still get a 215 with an extra gold nib for around the cost of an M400, or you could just swallow and leap to the M600/800. I reckon you're hooked so it will be more a question of which one you'll get first!

palp

Oh, and the Pelikan leather cases, although they look extravagant really are lifetime quality stuff. I think Ray has a deal on M600/800 pens at the moment where you get a free case... I would check it out.

matt j
04-03-08, 12:27 PM
I'm left handed, and can use any old right handed nib no problems at all.
.

I didnt mean it that way.

must be just me that suffers 'blue hand' and smudged ink syndrome :D

Have Fun
04-03-08, 12:53 PM
Received the Sailor pens today & only had an hour or so with them

Instant handwriting improvement with the Calligraphy pen though I still need much more practice

The brush pen has its own skill level designed into it & I could spend years developing technique without totally mastering it. Has certainly given me a glimpse into the patience & dedication that these Japanese & Chinese masters must have .. almost like you must think about every seperate stroke beforehand. Its unlikely to become the first stage sketch tool for me, more like reserved for more mature sketches & infill ink work.

No regrets with either purchase

palpnorte
04-03-08, 01:17 PM
How wet is the brush on the brush pen? And would you say the brush was springy (like sable, say) or easily moulded as you use it like a squirrel brush? I've looked at this pen quite a lot, but am not sure if I would use it.

palp

kuma
04-03-08, 01:29 PM
For a dark green suitable for Namiki/Pilot (which in my experience are quite dry writers) I 'm very fond of Montblanc's Racing Green, which is not British Racing Green as you would imagine, but the colour used by Jaguar quite early on - almost black with a khaki/olive tone. It's very individual, and a well thought out colour.
palp.

Sounds good. Montblanc does offer a Racing Green in cartridge. Pity. It won't fit the Dunhill.
The problem is the standard Pilot/Namiki cartridge green is a bright garish green.

Looks like I'm back to a converter.:(

Have Fun
04-03-08, 01:45 PM
I'm using Pelikan fount ink with it for my first trial .. very black & constant colour over the whole stroke
no need to wipe brush before use as you would a paint brush you just pick it up & use it & this ink dries on paper very quick

The fibres seem very stable in shape better than most brushes I have, but I don't know about long term use .. it springs back into shape after each stroke .. with a brush I often squeeze it to get the shape.

Obviously its designed for Japanese / Chinese caligraphy .. my use will be for simple drawing or ink infill .. too soon to tell really.
Curved lines have their own technique .. an S is best drawn from bottom up ..in normal draw the S is very bold.

This is a unique pen with its own set of rules & unlikely that many will ever have need of one
but its cheap enough to give it a shot.

kuma
04-03-08, 01:56 PM
For a traditional calligraphy, I still prefer the old-fashioned Japanese sumi stick and its stone ink well.

I've used a pre-mixed bottled ink, but somehow it is not the same.

A brush pen?
That's called cheating. :)

Paul L
04-03-08, 09:45 PM
I'm missing something here as I've tried to go back to a fountain pen a few times and ended up pi55ed off with the mess.

Mine are an ordinary black/gold Mont Blanc which was serviced in the past but each time the lid is removed the part of the barrel you hold gets messy without realising, perhaps from the inside of the lid. The cheap Parker is okay when it works. Both seem to dry up with consummate ease and are more trouble than they are worth.

I remained confused about whether they/any fountain pen:
1. should be kept at home (kind of defeats the point of having one) or can travel
2. must be kept up/down/doesn't matter
3. must have a particular ink in order to actually work

If I could overcome these irritations I would join the club and abandon this constant stream of throw away plastic ballpens or 'alcoholic' roller-ball pens.

timbre
04-03-08, 10:06 PM
When gel ink was introduced I switched to the Pilot G2.

They are not cheap for disposable pens but they have flow that comes close to a good fountain pen.

I use fountain pens rarely now for some of the same reasons already mentioned.

I found that the Parker Gel refills were not as good as the cheapos I could find in discount stores at significantly lower costs.

Gel refills do run out a lot faster than normal ballpoints but you cannot compare the way they can lay down a line.

I have always preferred a broad/bold line so for those that like real fine tips the Pilot V-Tip rollerballs might be in order. They are x-fine and for my tastes are too scratchy but for those with a light stroke are the ideal mate.

Have Fun
06-03-08, 04:14 AM
The Lamy Studio arrived Medium nib brushed Stainless version
Almost twice the weight of the Sailor & about 20mm longer with thicker barrel
I don't like using it with the cap on as it feels unbalanced & I don't think I could use it for extended writing periods. The Sailor is more comfortable with the cap on.

Very nicely made but for me its proved
A) that I want a thin, light pen of about the same length as the Lamy ~ 130mm uncapped
B) a medium nib is very good, but the steel Lamy nib feels stiff
C) prefer plastic to rubberised grip

Having said that the Lamy is good enough for general short term use & at the price I paid I would not worry about losing it.

Ideally I need to try a few pens but no local shops available

palpnorte
07-03-08, 10:33 AM
Have Fun - so, modified rapture then. From what you've said, maybe a cheapo Lamy safari might have been a better buy - but then you wouldn't have that lovely sculptural clip on the cap to admire ... and BTW, now you are a fully paid up pen collector, you should know that 'putting the cap on' is callled posting. A simple distinction maybe, but it marks the chosen (us) out from the biro-toting riffraff (them). Talking of which, timbre - gel pens??? Good God, man.... wash your filthy mouth out with Quink right now.

palp

guybat
07-03-08, 10:51 AM
I've got a Lamy Safari EF arriving tomorrow. Can't go wrong for 12.

The broad/fine confusion came about because I thought I'd use it more for writing (medium/broad), but have now realised I'll actually use it more for drawing (fine/extra fine).

So might now get a Pelikan with a customised EF nib from Richardspens.

Have Fun
07-03-08, 11:43 AM
Had an email from Niche saying that Pelikans are going up April 1 so put orders in now

incidentally Guy that Sailor Calligraphy pen writes fine as well as broad depending on how you tilt the pen ~ 14.30

Yeah I knew about "posting" & considered the term but I was too shy what with me being a newbie collector & all (2 FP's)

I can see the attraction in all this there are some seriously nice pens out there but the best are always unobtanium.

Have Fun
07-03-08, 11:48 AM
This is my favourite for sheer good looking elegance

might even treat myself for my birthday next year (one of those ending in 0)

http://www.internetpens.net/catalog/item/1472440/1507573.htm

palpnorte
07-03-08, 12:04 PM
Well Have Fun, I think two pens [thinking along Scientological lines] would qualify you to use the 'p' word. But you probably have to buy at least five more pens to move up to the next level and find out about 'the brown paper bag trick'. No searching on FPN, now - that doesn't count ..... oh, and don't think you haven't been spotted.

guybat - nib size is really weird. I think I'm on the fine/medium cusp (which Pelikan/MB/Lamy seem do so well) which is easy to get hold of - but from what I gather, when you move up past EF you have to look east. People say that Pelikans get scratchy after F, and I once had an EF nib from Niche pens which I didn't much like. All my Japanese pens are medium, but I just can't imagine what anything finer could actually be like without ripping the paper. I prefer writing with an F nib, but if I look at the results, M is probably more flattering to my handwriting. How are you going to deal with customs with Richardspens? I just ordered a nib from him, but stuck to the cheapest so it would come under $35. When I've bought stuff from the States privately, people seem to be willing to mark stuff down to avoid duty, but I don't think he will.

palp

palpnorte
07-03-08, 12:07 PM
Eyedroppers now..... A Lost Soul. But how big is it? Those things tend to be like relay batons!

Have Fun
07-03-08, 12:08 PM
Yeah working a nib in on brown paper ~ what the merits or alternatives are I don't know ~ I assume its the rough side

palpnorte
07-03-08, 12:09 PM
Grasshopper, I can see my work is done.

Have Fun
07-03-08, 12:18 PM
Eyedroppers now..... A Lost Soul. But how big is it? Those things tend to be like relay batons!

Probably massive but I don't know if I would have guts to ink it ~ bit like Hancock with the car he couldn't drive so he just used to sit in it, pretend, & make vroom vroom noises.

palpnorte
07-03-08, 12:39 PM
We're sad bastards, aren't we ... everything comes down to willy waving in the end. I've even heard tell of eye dropper demonstrators (i.e. completely clear) so you just have gallons of beautifully bubbly ink swooshing round in an uncontrolled whirl of orgasmic pen-shaped pleasure....... God, it's just so hot.

Having read what you wrote on FPN - I have exactly the same depressing problem as you - incipient arthritis in the base of the thumb. The conventional wisdom has it that bigger pens make life easier, but like you I find the exact opposite. My opinion is that whatever size nib you choose, you would be best initially to go for a Pelikan, or maybe a Sailor because of the weight/diameter thing. Their 1911 model comes in two sizes, and the smaller costs about the same as a Pelikan and comes in lots of exciting colour combinations. Andy's Pens (http://www.andys-pens.co.uk/index.shtml) has loads of good stuff (never bought from him myself, but he does have a very good reputation). Sailor do have glassily smooth nibs though, which although initially impressive, for me lack that last nth of character that Pelikan give you (the pen equivalent of a loudness button). Sailor are also incredibly consistent. Buying a Pelikan on the other hand, is more like adopting a cabbage Patch doll. I've got about 18 Pelikans now, and almost all F nibs - and each one is subtly different... this is probably the thing that keeps me buying them. Other people find this same characteristic irritating, so it's your choice!

palp

martin clark
07-03-08, 01:39 PM
Hmm... all good stuff, but jumping-in rather late here:

Years of annotating drawings mean I tend to write in sma^^^^ minute, cursive block caps at a rate rather faster than 'proper' handwriting (!) This usually has me reaching for a 0.25mm draughting pen to scribble with, which, naturally, I'd like to redress...Having inherited my grandfather's rather lovely gold Parker 51, where should I send it to get a rather finer nib fitted that I could grow into..?

Alternative suggestions gratefully received. I like the look of the M200 Pelikans, but doubt I could do anything but blot expensively with them so far!


PS said grandpa was a proper old-style Pharmacist...handwriting style a nice C19 large copperplate - and, remarkably, very legible.

Have Fun
07-03-08, 02:16 PM
The Rotring pencil I use is about 8 gram & a pen at this weight is ideal for my hand.

Yet to see better really than the Pelikan especially the cheaper variety 200 as this looks a best buy at my stage, though there are some new old Classic series on Ebay & from Singapore that look slimmer & quite classy with a 14 K nib. I think these are cartridge, not sure whether the convertor will fit. Very tempted with these.

Know anything about the Aurora Ipsilion? Barrel size? weight? These on offer at 30 in UK

Have Fun
07-03-08, 02:28 PM
Martin we share same script, though I'm well out of practice since using CAD for the last 8 years ~ check out Architext Fonts free somewhere like 1001 Fonts. Anni font is actually my favourite though I tend to use Arial 99% of the time.

Sailor have an Architects Pen / Nib ~ you may have to put fees up to pay for it though.

I also hadn't twigged until yesterday that Pelikan make Graphos pens.

It would be interesting to get a nib doctored for notation.

Have Fun
07-03-08, 02:49 PM
Stone me .. I just came across the Sailor Chalana its ultra thin & 10 Gram at 38
Nib is Fine only though

martin clark
07-03-08, 03:12 PM
Thanks HF, might try that...

I trained on a drawing board, and have only ever worked in CAD offices ...which naturally means I do everything 'sketch-to-scale' ;)

EJB
08-03-08, 02:52 AM
I have returned to using a fountain pen after years of slumming it with biros. It has taken a little practice to get back into the way of using a fountain pen again, but my writing has much improved. I am currently using a Cross Townsend Medalist. Its a bit bling, but writes well.

guybat
11-03-08, 07:40 AM
Just got my Lamy Safari in graphite with an EF nib, which feels really scratchy and uncontrollable compared to my old Rotring EF Art Pen.

Not at all what I expected - I'll go and compare my Rotring with a Pelikan EF tomorrow. Maybe I already own the perfect drawing pen? No fun...

Have Fun
11-03-08, 08:11 AM
Just got my Lamy Safari in graphite with an EF nib, which feels really scratchy and uncontrollable compared to my old Rotring EF Art Pen.

Not at all what I expected - I'll go and compare my Rotring with a Pelikan EF tomorrow. Maybe I already own the perfect drawing pen? No fun...

Dunno enuf about them but I've never had a smooth writing fine nib (in a fountain pen) & always found them scratchy.
Ordered a Lamy Linea yesterday with broad nib & a spare fine nib to try
The Linea pen is supposed to be light & slim which is what I wanted & I decided against the Sailor Chalena as it does not have other nibs available except fine ( besides that it was twice the cost of the lamy)

Maybe worth trying different nibs for your Lamy & at just 3.60 maybe worth a shot.

You could also try a true drawing pen / drafting pen like a rotring (but faber castell was my preferred choice) nib sizes 1.5 2.5 3.5 etc you can get a mini set of these

vuk
12-03-08, 11:54 AM
got the "hero" pen from art yesterday and, indeed, it functions better than my old one. i just wish they didn't encase the nib so much--it limits the flexing and therefore what you can do stylistically. seems well suited to accounting and things like that, however. also working well for quick notes. will keep it on the desk. here is a snapshot (parker, hero, pelikan [with medium nib])...

http://vukfoto.com/misc/pen_trial.jpg


paper is so crap these days. any suggestions on that front?


thanks again, art!

vuk.

auric
12-03-08, 12:24 PM
Hero, sandwiched between parker, & pelikan - looks good enough to eat.

kuma
14-03-08, 08:11 PM
For a dark green suitable for Namiki/Pilot (which in my experience are quite dry writers) I 'm very fond of Montblanc's Racing Green, which is not British Racing Green as you would imagine, but the colour used by Jaguar quite early on - almost black with a khaki/olive tone. It's very individual, and a well thought out colour.
palp,

I stopped by at my usual pen stockist today to see if he had any Montblanc Racing Green ink.

He didn't but I picked up a Private Reserve Ink's Avocado which is close enough for a deep olive green.

Enough damage done for the day as I also walked away with Waterman's Exception (http://www.penbox.co.uk/images/wat44%20exception.jpg)
. :rolleyes:

vuk
14-03-08, 08:33 PM
Enough damage done for the day as I also walked away with Waterman's Exception (http://www.penbox.co.uk/images/wat44%20exception.jpg)
. :rolleyes:

that is very nice. what was the damage?

vuk.

p.s. can you write "vast engine" with it for us?

kuma
14-03-08, 09:41 PM
http://www.kumadesign.com/PIX/vastengine.jpg
vuk,

It was around 370$USD. It was a bit more than an M600.

For the reference, middle one is Dunhill AD2000 and last one is the Pelican M600.

I do like the feel of the Exception, but it is on a phat side. Depending on paper, too much ink flow. It's a soft tip for a brand new nib. ( medium tip )

It has unusually a thick barrel for the Waterman and much heavier so not sure if it's good for a lengthy writing.

p.s. Your handwriting is much neater than mine.

Paul L
15-03-08, 01:01 AM
Personally I think your handwriting shows a sharper mind Kuma and I wish mine matched it. The graphologists will be along shortly to tell us what is psychologically wrong with the pair of you...

I'm really tempted by a M600. Do you really get a better write than the cheaper stainless/iridium pens at 100 or less, for example the Pelikan Pura set on special offer everywhere?

Have Fun
15-03-08, 02:26 PM
The Lamy Linea arrived today fitted with broad nib & is an exceptionally nice pen
Slim about the same width as a Pentel 500 & other Mechanical pencils I have & weighs near 15 gram which is about half the weight of the Lamy Studio. The Nibs are the same.

The broad nib is the nicest I've used so far & very fluid to write with. I've yet to try the spare fine nib to compare.

This Linea Pen is very nice to hold & no sense of any strain in my thumb ~ after writing with the Linea & then picking up the Studio I had an immediate feeling of pressure build up in the thumb from the Studio.

I bought this from The Writing Desk for 26 delivery included

Design wise the pen equals the Studio for engineering build quality & for me it is a far more comfortable pen to use.

Thanks to Palp for his advice, I guess I found what I wanted with this pen ~ (at least for the time being)

guybat
25-03-08, 11:35 AM
I just got a lovely pen from eBay - a Fine 18k gold nibbed version of the Rotring Art Pen. I liked it so much I bought a second one!

Never seen them anywhere else, apart from this guy who has plenty of NOS:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ROTRING-CALLIGRAPHY-ART-PEN-GOLD-FP-F-BRAND-NEW_W0QQitemZ120234546464QQihZ002QQcategoryZ7281QQ tcZphotoQQcmdZViewItemQQ_trksidZp1742.m153.l1262

Have Fun
25-03-08, 12:53 PM
http://search.ebay.de/

Unlikely link will work but plenty on German E Bay

kuma
25-03-08, 06:39 PM
[QUOTE=guybat;572850]I just got a lovely pen from eBay - a Fine 18k gold nibbed version of the Rotring Art Pen. I liked it so much I bought a second one!


Great.

Now can you write a *vast engine* for us? :)

robert_cyrus
26-03-08, 07:09 AM
You've all tempted me!
I'm about to order a Pelikan M200 in marbled blue with F nib from the writing desk, and have selected Noodlers Zhivago ink (mostly because I like the name!).
http://www.thewritingdesk.co.uk/ink_cat/nood_zhiva.jpg
I used to write with a fountain pen when at school, and won a Rotring fountain pen in a competition in Blueprint magazine when I was at university (which I still have).
I'll write "vast engine" and post a pic when the pen arrives.

kuma
26-03-08, 10:29 AM
Zhivago ink looks to be interesting.

Sort of like faded green/black?

robert_cyrus
27-03-08, 05:03 AM
And now I've ordered a Pelikano and some "Private Reserve Midnight Blues" ink cartridges, so I have something inexpensive for scribbling at work. (Plus I can use the cartridges with my Rotring)
Slippery slope to addictiveness .....

shane
27-03-08, 05:29 AM
Surprised not to have seen Conway Stewart mentioned on here.

http://www.conwaystewart.com/home.php?osCsid=1d45b676afba3db645203fbd27a04cf3

Have Fun
27-03-08, 05:56 AM
And now I've ordered a Pelikano and some "Private Reserve Midnight Blues" ink cartridges, so I have something inexpensive for scribbling at work. (Plus I can use the cartridges with my Rotring)
Slippery slope to addictiveness .....

Yes its addictive .. in about a month from a standing start I now have 4 fountain pens (actually bought 5 but I sent a Pelikano back because I wasn't that happy with it).. each pen has its own personality & character & almost impossible to decide on a favourite.

I got a Pelikan 200 today kind of a limited edition & the most expensive purchase to date. I haven't inked it yet -first thoughts are that its a bit more cumbersome to hold - threads too close to nib & raised higher & barrel is thick & not tapered. A cheaper Sailor Profit was a lot nicer to hold straight off the block. The Lamy Studio & Linea are way more comfortable.
So it may be just down to how the nib writes

dan m
28-03-08, 08:59 AM
Pen-experts,

I've been using J. Herbin "Universal snap-in cartridges" in my A.G. Spalding & Bros. pen:

http://www.jherbin.com/images/fpe.jpg

J.Herbin (http://www.jherbin.com/fountain_pen_inks.shtml)

Is there a universal cartridge converter that would allow me to use bottled ink. I can find converters of pelikans - will that work?

robert_cyrus
28-03-08, 09:39 AM
There are a few converters here http://www.thewritingdesk.co.uk/spares.php
But the text suggests none of these are universal, they all appear to be designed for pens of the same make.
Perhaps an email to enquiries@thewritingdesk.co.uk will provide some assistance?

dan m
28-03-08, 09:54 AM
Thanks for the link - it looks like the "genuine Pelikan piston converter that fits the Celebry, Epoch and other Pelikan cartridge/converter pens that take International and long International size cartridges" would do the trick. I'm in the US, so I'll hunt for one here - I've just found a website called pendemonium.com that has *lots* of tempting stuff. Hmmm, that Pelikan M200 at $70- looks tempting too...

Paul L
28-03-08, 03:00 PM
It never ceases to amuse me when the forum financial f***wits jump on criticism of the UK economy or British buying mentality as another Daily Mail rant. Here on "treasure island" we pay :$ ratios on products such as these so an M200 costs 70 against that $70. If it were US product it might be understandable but pens are made in China mostly and Pelikans as one of the exceptions still in their native Germany FFS.

It's a rip-off so when I looked at pens and prices recently I vowed to buy one or two when I'm in the USA or Asia. It saddens me not to buy from the brand on-line shop but instead of paying 120 for a Cross Apogee I paid 45 via eBay as I could not justify the price difference. Yes, the pen is fine. I suspect in the USA you pay $100 tops.

Have Fun
28-03-08, 03:14 PM
Actually from what I see (& unlike nearly every other product) pens are near the same price in UK as in the USA particularly for German manuf'd pens like Lamy & Pelikan .. you can get a pelikan 200 for 45 & for $70 - 80 in the states .. obviously there are e bay deals etc. & some dealers offer cheaper than UK. www.joonpens.com New York. Some & those offering nib services offer pens at their full retail $ equivalent value.
I think you have to shop around in all countries.

robert_cyrus
31-03-08, 05:32 AM
I now have my Pelikan M200 and Pelikano and have brought the Rotring back into service.
The Pelikano, with its M nib, writes perfectly and suits me very well. The F nib in the M200 I found quite "scratchy" by comparison. However, the Rotring too has an F nib, and while it isn't functioning properly (I suspect it has simply dried out, though it now has fresh ink cartridges with a pair of Private Reserve American Blue I received gratis from the Writing Desk), the F nib does not feel "scratchy". I therefore suspect it was the paper itself bringing a scratchiness to the M200.

It's great, though, the ink flow and general feel of writing with a fountain pen is so much nicer than writing with a biro.

robert_cyrus
31-03-08, 05:43 AM
I've identified my Rotring, it's a 700 - I've found an image posted below. One went for $109 recently on ebay.

http://www.electricedge.com/greymatter/images6/rotring700.jpg

dan m
31-03-08, 06:50 AM
That Rotring looks fantastic - great clip design.

Have Fun
31-03-08, 09:36 AM
From what I read it seems a common complaint with the M200 Fine Nibs being scratchy
You can do all sorts to smooth them ~ apparent recommendations are to use ultra fine abrasive pads - Micromesh pads 1200 grit / alternatives being a nail glosser from boots / brown paper / glass

Be careful not to polish it too much with the abrasive pads though.

In my limited experience I've used brown paper & tracing paper on my Lamy Fine steel nib & judge it to be much less scratchy than when I first had it ~ (but it still "sounds" scratchy when I write) ~ also true that paper makes a difference as well as the inks you use.

BlueEyes
30-06-10, 01:22 AM
I once had a Mont Blanc Meistertuck (...the last word is spelt wrong )...great pen it was like writing with a cigar.

taffyboy1
05-09-11, 06:54 AM
I just bought an M200 fountain pen from the guys at Niche pens, as I work near their office I arranged to collect the pen in person with Ross.

Having abrubtly dropped by they very kindly engraved a box plaque for me whilst I waited and better still let me view some of their gorgeous pens, very nice quality :) !!

great guys to deal with, have a look at their website its a great stop for a special present that anyone would be delighted with.

http://www.pelikanpens.co.uk/

TaffyTim

But which one? (I'm getting a bit evangelical, I think)

If you go for a Pelikan, then consider getting it from Niche Pens (http://www.pelikanpens.co.uk/index.htm). Ray is a very nice guy, and they are the cheapest I've found in the UK (and will let you do things like home dem the nibs!)

palp

prowla
05-09-11, 07:29 AM
Maybe it's a case of "jumpers for goalposts" and all that.

Fountain pens are nice, there's no doubt about it, but they have flaws too; I recall having blue fingertips where the ink has leaked, smudged writing, needing a blotter pad, writers cramp, etc.

Joe Hutch
05-09-11, 07:38 AM
I once had an ink bottle break inside my school bag, leaving ink stains all over my brand-new Physics textbook. I hastily covered the book with brown paper (which we were supposed to do with all out textbooks) so the mishap remained my secret. Until now.

aquapiranha
05-09-11, 07:41 AM
Maybe it's a case of "jumpers for goalposts" and all that.

Fountain pens are nice, there's no doubt about it, but they have flaws too; I recall having blue fingertips where the ink has leaked, smudged writing, needing a blotter pad, writers cramp, etc.

No different to the old overpriced watches in the other thread. Both things invented a long time ago, both superseded by modern, cheaper and better alternatives. There will always be people who still like them however, nothing wrong with that.

Mick P
05-09-11, 08:24 AM
No different to the old overpriced watches in the other thread. Both things invented a long time ago, both superseded by modern, cheaper and better alternatives. There will always be people who still like them however, nothing wrong with that.

aquapiranha

Not quite true. I collect fountain pens and believe me, pens from the 1940s are much prized because the gold nib looks more discreet and it has a better quality nib which gives a better degree of flex.

Also the old rubber sacs are now replaced with neoprene ones and they are much more useable than a modern one.

Vintage is certainly a better bet.

Regards

Mick

aquapiranha
05-09-11, 08:33 AM
Hi Mick. technological advances aside, it seems to me that the need for writing pens (fountain or otherwise) is being rapidly reduced by the use of email etc. Gone are the days when most people would write letters as one of the few forms of communication. As I said however, they are nice to own and that is why people have them but I personally would not want one. Just like an old, expensive and in relative terms inaccurate watch, nothing more than jewelery to me.

I used to use rotring technical pens in college, and there was a certain 'pride of ownership' with them , but a cheap propelling pencil would have done as well.

taffyboy1
05-09-11, 09:25 AM
Maybe it's a case of "jumpers for goalposts" and all that.

Fountain pens are nice, there's no doubt about it, but they have flaws too; I recall having blue fingertips where the ink has leaked, smudged writing, needing a blotter pad, writers cramp, etc.

Yes its a bit like saying who on earth would want to use an old 60's designed box with glass tubes in? no bass, thermal cycling effect issues, expensive to run when you could buy a modern chinese rip off amplifier that can hook up to your supa doopa MP3 player! ;) lol

James
05-09-11, 12:53 PM
technological advances aside, it seems to me that the need for writing pens (fountain or otherwise) is being rapidly reduced by the use of email etc. Gone are the days when most people would write letters as one of the few forms of communication.
In my job, I still need to take notes and sign papers. For those untechnological tasks, I use a Waterman fountain pen and bottled ink.