View Full Version : Advice needed for a bike ride


Mick P
30-12-10, 05:15 PM
Chaps

I am in the final stages of completing the restoration of a 1930s path racer which is basically a 1930s racing bicycle. It is a 3 speed racer which was the going thing back then.

This is a summary of what has been done.

Frame: Fully resprayed in high gloss black. all paint work has been done profesionally.

Wheels: Rims have been resprayed matt black. New steel spokes on both wheels. New sturmey archer front hub.

Tyres: Brand new Schwable cream classic roadster with high vis band on the wall. New inner tubes.

Chainset: Original cranks polished up. New chain.

Stem: Vintage stem off ebay, been polished up. A1 condition.

Handlebars: Northroad moustache style, brand new.

Gears: Sturmey Archer 3 speed. Hub and trigger A1 condition.

Grips: Wooden soft grips, brand new and will be stained to match seat )

Saddle: Brooks B66S leather saddle with seat post, both brand new.

Brakes: Vintage calipers bought off ebay. Levers are original. A1 condition

Bike stand: Original, A1 condition.

I am still trying to locate some original pedals and once it is finally tweaked, it is ready to ride.

Progress ceased over the recent weeks because the garage was bloody freezing but I expect the bicycle to be complete by the end of January.

I intend to take the bike over to Italy in October 2011 and take part in a 250 mile trek in a non combative race known as the L'Eroica.

Here is some information on the L'Eroica

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PjXaiJ25Ks

It is raced by old geezers on old bikes, infact the one major rule is that the bike must be over 20 years of age and I want to do it, even if I die in the attempt.

If I complete the bike by the end of January, I will have 8 months to knock myself into shape.

Therefore can any of you biking chappies give me a pointer on how to train for this.

Swindon has a 25 mile cycle path that circum-navigates the town, so i need to work up to 10 laps.

Also half of my time will be in Spain, so I need to buy another bike out there.

Any advice from experienced bikers will be appreciated.

Regards

Mick

ClaraBannister
30-12-10, 05:25 PM
http://www.speedplay.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=pedalmuseum.intro

I don't know if you've come across the above site, but it may be of help in sourcing appropriate pedals. I'm just about to complete my old Dawes Galaxy, which has been in pieces for about ten years. Now, between careers, I might get the chance to put it together. Like you, I'm keen to keep it period correct, which means the dreaded cottered chainset. Your bike looks great, but those tyres look a bit high in terms of rolling resistance. More the sort of thing you'd find on a Dutch delivery bike than a vintage racer. However, it looks more the part than the Pashley Guv'nor, which seems to me to be a waste of 531 tubing.

I'm no expert, but the only way I know to train for a cycle race is to ride. I have a cousin who lives in Australia. Every year, he and his colleagues in business travel to Tasmania, where they take part in an epic bike ride for charity. They have a huge support infrastructure, including a vehicle called the "sag wagon" in which riders who fall by the wayside get carried to the next stage. Such is the Australian macho ethos that even overweight middle-aged senior executives would literally rather die than have to resort to the sag wagon. Good luck on your ride. Make sure you break in that saddle.

muzzer
30-12-10, 05:41 PM
Mick.
Can you leave me your record deck in your will.

ClaraBannister
30-12-10, 05:45 PM
Am I hallucinating? I know there was a picture of his bike, but it's disappeared.

matt j
30-12-10, 05:47 PM
Mick, how long do you have to complete the 250 mile race you intend on entering?

The only way to train is to get out and ride unless you absolutely cannot bare the weather, in which case it might be wise to buy a Turbo Trainer. Still no substitute for the real thing though.

PS- sounds exactly like a Pashley Guvnor, make sure to get some pictures up.

ClaraBannister
30-12-10, 05:49 PM
Ooh, we don't think he's bought a Pashley Guv'nor, do we? In the picture that was there (trust me), I thought the chainset looked a bit modern. Conspiracies are everywhere.

Mick P
30-12-10, 05:50 PM
Clara

You are not hallucinating because I took the picture of the bike out because there is a load of flicker rubbish attached to it. I will try and resend it tomorrow.

Finding pedals is not that difficult, there are several suppliers of vintage stuff, it's just I want to be as period as possible.

Regards

Mick

PS The frame is a 1950s Raleigh

ClaraBannister
30-12-10, 05:52 PM
You should have opened a new Flickr account, so we couldn't link to your porn collection.

Mick P
30-12-10, 05:54 PM
You should have opened a new Flickr account, so we couldn't link to your porn collection.

It is Mrs Micks account and she does not permit mucky stuff

ClaraBannister
30-12-10, 05:57 PM
Quite right too. If the frame is a 1950s Raleigh, why fret about 1930s pedals? Just get some you find comfortable. Campagnolo-style quill pedals (my own favourites) have been around from different manufacturers for most of the 20th century. Did you have any problems with thread compatability using a Raleigh frame?

Mick P
30-12-10, 06:01 PM
Clara

It went along all rather easy to be honest.

I take your point on the pedals and I may order some tomorrow.

Mick

PS I just need advice on a training programme

The Captain
30-12-10, 06:03 PM
is this the bicycle with your special wing mirrors on it? as for somewhere to go and ride it id suggest the M25.

Mick P
30-12-10, 06:07 PM
Captain or should I say private

I would prefer to depart from this mortal coil in Italy rather than the M25.

Mick

chainrule
30-12-10, 06:19 PM
tits - time in the saddle

in other words: ride, ride, ride. it doesn't matter where, why or how, just do it. there's no substitute for conditioning.

dirt roads? try to get wide tires. 250 miles on a vintage bike on dirt roads could be brutal. better get used to a hard saddle pounding your nether region.

Mick P
30-12-10, 06:21 PM
Gordon

Many thanks so TITS it is.

The tyres are wide and puncture resistant.

The saddle is a Brooks and I hope to bed it in to fit my posterior.

Regards

Mick

Mick P
30-12-10, 06:28 PM
Mick, how long do you have to complete the 250 mile race you intend on entering?

The only way to train is to get out and ride unless you absolutely cannot bare the weather, in which case it might be wise to buy a Turbo Trainer. Still no substitute for the real thing though.

PS- sounds exactly like a Pashley Guvnor, make sure to get some pictures up.

Matt

I believe you start at 5.00am and finish around 11.00pm.

I will be knackered but it is doable.

Mick

Tony L
30-12-10, 06:57 PM
I believe you start at 5.00am and finish around 11.00pm.

I will be knackered but it is doable.

That's 18 hours at 13.8 mph, not an easy target at all, in fact I'd argue it was impossible for anyone other than the ultra-fit and youthful. To place this in perspective a quick Google indicates the average speed of a Tour De France rider is 24mph, i.e. a peak-fitness athlete riding cutting edge modern technology. Luckily my now well honed powers of Google-Fu reveals that L'Eroica is not 250 miles at all, but a choice of routes between 38 and 205 Kilometres! (link (http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/last-call-for-leroica-italys-vintage-bike-race-2069909.html)). Even so I'd still be inclined to pick one of the shorter ones! Why not try something like the London To Brighton Bike Ride (http://www.bhf.org.uk/get-involved/events/bike-rides/london-to-brighton.aspx) first? That's a realistic first goal IMO.

Tony.

ErikL
30-12-10, 07:04 PM
I intend to take the bike over to Italy in October 2011 and take part in a 250 mile trek in a non combative race known as the L'Eroica.
It reminds me of Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_to_Portland_Bicycle_Classic). Most riders take 2 days (200 mi./322 km).

dan m
30-12-10, 07:05 PM
Mick,

I thought this was one of your wind-ups, but in case you're serious, I can strongly
recommend Friel's "The Cyclist's Training Bible". Read this and follow the advice in
putting together a training program and you will maximize your chance of reaching
your goal. While there's no substitute for time in the saddle, knowing how to vary
workouts and when to rest (called periodization) leads to the biggest gains in fitness.
Perhaps there's a local certified cycling coach nearby who'd be willing to put a training
schedule together for you for a fee.

cheers,

Dan

demotivated
30-12-10, 09:40 PM
Here are some 100 mile UK day rides:

http://www.action.org.uk/100

I don't think they are races, but they may give you times. They are to help people who want to try Lands end/John O groats, and to raise money for a medical slush fund.

Holidays:

http://www.lovevelo.co.uk/come-cycling-new

Some photodiaries of similair.

http://www.blackbirdsf.org/randonneuring/

It sounds a logistic nightmare without support [the good lady?]. I hate repairs away from home, you have no panniers for tools, luggage etc. I would choose a cycling holiday instead..

JCL
30-12-10, 10:56 PM
tits - time in the saddle

in other words: ride, ride, ride. it doesn't matter where, why or how, just do it. there's no substitute for conditioning.

\

All the advice you need. You won't need any speed so just steady state low intensity rides as long as you can. Start at 20K and add 10 every ride.

prowla
31-12-10, 02:07 AM
On rainy days, you could supplement your training by going to a gym and watching TV on a flatscreen with pumping music in the background.

Mick P
31-12-10, 02:39 AM
That's 18 hours at 13.8 mph, not an easy target at all, in fact I'd argue it was impossible for anyone other than the ultra-fit and youthful. To place this in perspective a quick Google indicates the average speed of a Tour De France rider is 24mph, i.e. a peak-fitness athlete riding cutting edge modern technology. Luckily my now well honed powers of Google-Fu reveals that L'Eroica is not 250 miles at all, but a choice of routes between 38 and 205 Kilometres! (link (http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/last-call-for-leroica-italys-vintage-bike-race-2069909.html)). Even so I'd still be inclined to pick one of the shorter ones! Why not try something like the London To Brighton Bike Ride (http://www.bhf.org.uk/get-involved/events/bike-rides/london-to-brighton.aspx) first? That's a realistic first goal IMO.

Tony.

Tony

You are correct that the L'Eroica is a choice of routes but you may as well aim for the big one.

Also it is in Tuscany which makes it a bit of a holiday. It is just something worth experiencing.

Regards

Mick

Mick P
31-12-10, 02:41 AM
Mick,

I thought this was one of your wind-ups, but in case you're serious, I can strongly
recommend Friel's "The Cyclist's Training Bible". Read this and follow the advice in
putting together a training program and you will maximize your chance of reaching
your goal. While there's no substitute for time in the saddle, knowing how to vary
workouts and when to rest (called periodization) leads to the biggest gains in fitness.
Perhaps there's a local certified cycling coach nearby who'd be willing to put a training
schedule together for you for a fee.

cheers,

Dan

Dan

Thanks, that seems good advice.

Mick

Tony L
31-12-10, 02:55 AM
You are correct that the L'Eroica is a choice of routes but you may as well aim for the big one.

It's pretty much half the length you understood it to be too, so may be attainable with some serious preparation and training (205km = 127.3 miles). Have you any idea if it's a fairly flat route?

Tony.

Mick P
31-12-10, 03:01 AM
Tony

It is long gentle hills up and down.

Mick

Mr Cat
31-12-10, 03:13 AM
good luck anyway, Mick :)

Tony L
31-12-10, 03:35 AM
It is long gentle hills up and down.

Are you going to have a go at the London To Brighton one first? It's just under half the length and several months prior to L'Eroica, so an ideal intermediate / training stage. I wish I'd done it myself when I lived in London - I always intended to but never actually got round to it. Cycling to Brighton and getting the train back would probably have been within my limits!

Tony.

SteveB
31-12-10, 03:39 AM
As others have said - get out there and get pedalling is what it's all about, but you'll want some structure to your sessions. Here's a training schedule for general long-distance riding that I found on the web: http://www.doitforcharity.com/cycling-training-guide.aspx

For something more specific, try the forums at http://www.bikeradar.com/forums/ and you're bound to find some people who have done it previously and can give some tips.

Don't underestimate the toll it takes, I've done a few 100m rides and London-Paris a couple of years back. Unless you are super-fit it really will take it out of you but well worth it for the experience.

andy831
31-12-10, 03:40 AM
205km = 127.3 miles

Still a fair old trip for a gentleman of Mick`s advancing years.

The football team I played for did a sponsored bike ride from Blackpool to home about 50 miles or so. Pretty fit bunch of lads too at the time, but to a man they all said never again.....I really respect you regular bikists :D

bor
31-12-10, 05:18 AM
I've got one thing to say, Mick.

Chamois Cream/Nappy rash cream. Get some.

Lets leave it there, rather than go into the details.

ClaraBannister
31-12-10, 06:09 AM
What's the dress code for this event? Are we talking tweed plus two's or Spandex? Don't forget to turn your cap back to front before long descents. I always attach mine with a lanyard so I don't have to stop if it does fly off. Have you finalised your gearing? My 3-speed seems to have a removable sprocket, so I guess you can get replacements with different numbers of teeth. I understand some people prefer to arrange second gear as the one for level straights, rather than third, as second is direct drive and hence the most efficient.

matt j
31-12-10, 06:39 AM
Mick, 127 miles is a serious distance for anyone, you'll need to get some serious work in between now and then to make this manageable without risk of severe injury or health issues.

50 miles is quite doable for anyone a few months into cycling IME, my goal is one of the 100 mile rides linked in an earlier post, I'd be happy with anything sub 10 hours to be perfectly honest.

ClaraBannister
31-12-10, 06:50 AM
I know that, if I were planning a mid-life crisis involving Tuscany in the summer, it would be more likely to feature a red Ferrari than a slightly ersatz vintage bicycle, mais chacun à son goût.

foxwelljsly
31-12-10, 08:25 AM
Mick,

250 miles in one day on a vintage bicycle is a very ambitious goal - even 127, as Tony suggests, would be quite an undertaking.

I would second (third?) everyone that has suggested just getting in the miles. As you are retired you have plenty of time to do so. Working up to 50-70 miles a day would prepare you for the considerable psychological challenge you have set yourself.

For routes, you are slap bang in the middle of some gorgeous countryside in North Wilts. Use Google maps on the walking option to put together some good loops from your home, gradually increasing them in length.

Don't worry about any high intensity training for sprints, as you're not going to be doing any sprinting and it can be agonisingly un-fun.

I wish I had the time to do as much cycling in lovely countryside as you have. Best of luck.

Paul R
31-12-10, 10:35 AM
Last autumn I read http://www.retrobike.co.uk/?p=1162 and thought that this event was quite appealing, apart from having to find an old (style) bike...

Anyway from a preparation pov I think Mick has to go out and ride up hills, find a level of effort he can sustain and work at increasing the effort and duration. Just riding round doing the miles but avoiding the difficult terrain isn't so helpful. IMO.

I'd recommend using a heart rate monitor, to get a rough idea of how hard you're working, and possibly for health reasons. Consult your doctor about that.

Paul

JCL
31-12-10, 11:12 AM
Last autumn I read http://www.retrobike.co.uk/?p=1162 and thought that this event was quite appealing, apart from having to find an old (style) bike...

Anyway from a preparation pov I think Mick has to go out and ride up hills, find a level of effort he can sustain and work at increasing the effort and duration. Just riding round doing the miles but avoiding the difficult terrain isn't so helpful. IMO.

I'd recommend using a heart rate monitor, to get a rough idea of how hard you're working, and possibly for health reasons. Consult your doctor about that.

Paul

I think an HRM is useless for this kind of event. He'll be anaerobic from the distance/lactate build-up no matter what the effort. You're right about the hills though! Also eat before you get hungry. Eat foods you're used to that you can easily digest on the bike. Drink little and very often. Managing energy intake is one of the hardest things to do on the bike.

Mick, You've basically got to get out and suffer. A lot. 200 hilly km's for a non cyclist is nuts. I predict you'll crack and go through hell but good luck all the same:D

Paul R
31-12-10, 11:39 AM
He'll be anaerobic from the distance/lactate build-up no matter what the effort.
I really hope not.

Paul

ClaraBannister
31-12-10, 11:58 AM
The tone of advice is getting a bit puritanical and health conscious, IMO. Life is for enjoying, because it's soon over. I'm unfamiliar with Tuscany, but my rides in Ireland used to be punctuated with frequent stops to have a smoke, and to take on (and discharge) fluids. I'm not talking about water - this was Ireland after all. Sure isn't alcohol a powerful, natural analgesic? I'm feeling no pain at the moment, and it's early yet.

Stuart Frazer
31-12-10, 12:02 PM
Mick

Aim high - finish < 12 Hours for the Hamper!

Stuart

JCL
31-12-10, 12:10 PM
I really hope not.

Paul

Well towards the end ;)

duncan
31-12-10, 02:22 PM
I know that, if I were planning a mid-life crisis involving Tuscany in the summer, it would be more likely to feature a red Ferrari than a slightly ersatz vintage bicycle, mais chacun à son goût.

That's so 1990s.

The new mid-life crisis involves some extreme physical challenge like running the Marathon des Sables, cycling from Land's End to John O'Groats or sailing the Atlantic (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/dietandfitness/3341837/Make-a-drama-out-of-a-midlife-crisis.html). Or in my case, celebrating my half-century climbing El Capitan in Yosemite Valley, California (http://picasaweb.google.com/duncan.critchley/Yosemite2010?authkey=Gv1sRgCMS5s_C765b3_wE#slidesh ow/5482540633080324818) earlier this year. So Mick is surfing the zeitgeist.




It is long gentle hills up and down.


205km, of which 110km are unsurfaced. Sounds tough to me.

Good luck Mick. Build up slowly, include some down-time into your training plan to allow the inevitable aches and pains to subside, and give yourself some intermediate goals. London-to-Brighton sounds a good 'un.

Andrewxyz
31-12-10, 02:29 PM
A ride report with some pics http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=39243.0

More discussion http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=39069.0

Mick, YACF is a very friendly cycling forum, you may want to join & ask for training advice there. I seem to remember you mentioning you'd had heart trouble earlier this year ? If so please mention this beforehand.

matt j
31-12-10, 02:45 PM
Looking at that report on YACF SA gears aren't allowed unless you're doing the shortest 35km route. Even so, if they were allowed it looks pretty impossible to do the full distance on a 3sp SA unless you like lots of walking.

Paul R
31-12-10, 04:32 PM
The regulations do not prohibit hub gears.

AFAICT from the regs they permit brand new bikes, as long as they are fitted with down tube shifters and the pedals are not 'clipless' (although clipless was actually introduced in period...)

I think Mick should go for it and target one of the longer distances. I think he should consider wider ranging gearing, but I've not ridden a hub gear since I was 11.

Paul

mudlark
01-01-11, 03:53 AM
I have an old style bike that I can't throw away.

It's a Sun manxman. 531 of about 1965/70 vintage. Originally 5 speed deraillier, now 10 speed. frame quite good, the rest is more modern.

Any interest (free).

stevec67
01-01-11, 05:21 AM
That sounds very nice Mudlark, YHM.:)

stevec67
01-01-11, 05:45 AM
Onto the OP, how Mick should tackle this. I'm a regular cyclist, albeit one who has been well below par this year following an accident. I consider 50 miles (road) to be a reasonable summer evening or half-day run, and while I've never done a century ride (100 miles) I have done 80-odd in a day and felt fresh so the extra 15 is feasible. Nevertheless, I wouldn't even consider a 200km (135mile) ride on chalk roads, in the heat, on a 3speed bike. It would flatten me. I don't want to be negative Mick but you are really stacking the odds:
You are over 60
You aren't a regular rider
It's partially off road
It's an old heavy bike, less efficient than a modern one
You fancy the longest course
It's in S Europe and that means hot conditions

Still, it won't hurt you to do some training. Buy a bike, any decent bike (not a £99 special, obviously), and start ridng it. When you get to the stage where 50 miles is an afternoon out, no big deal, and you are looking towards 100, then you will know what 135 means in a day. I wouldn't have wanted to tackle 135 miles on my best bike, in pre-accident condition, on road, without serious preparation. Chalk roads, 1930s bike, 3 speed, no thank you. Good luck though, on whichever route and bike you choose.

Mr Cat
01-01-11, 06:10 AM
yeah, I used to ride ~80 mile rides on an mtb (50/50 offroad) back in my early 20s - I was fit as a fiddle then, but I'd still be wrecked after a ride...

ClaraBannister
01-01-11, 06:27 AM
I have an old style bike that I can't throw away.

It's a Sun manxman. 531 of about 1965/70 vintage. Originally 5 speed deraillier, now 10 speed. frame quite good, the rest is more modern.

Any interest (free).

Gosh, I'd love that if I were not preoccupied with other things. I used to have a Sun Mist made in the early sixties, by which time Sun had become part of the Raleigh/TI empire, and adopted the Raleigh thread pitch. My bike looked better than it was. It had a Campagnolo transfer on the top tube, but the Campag rear changer was their steel Valentino model. When I took the bike to bits to repaint it, I discovered that it was not even made from tubing, but pipe. There was an internal seam visible in the main tubes. In any event, I had lots of use out of it, and finally sold it to a chap for his daughter to commute with in London. When I acquired my 531 Dawes, the difference was noticeable, and the frame was a better fit for me anyway, as I'm quite leggy.

Mick P
01-01-11, 06:41 AM
Chaps

I have got some pedals and hope to assemble it complete by tomorrow.

Regards

Mick

ClaraBannister
01-01-11, 08:02 AM
This is excellent news. Don't forget (not that you would) that one of the pedals has a left hand thread.

johnhunt
01-01-11, 08:41 AM
I'd treat that distance with mucho respect and get lots of riding in before contemplating any kind of endurance event.In the process you might well fall in love with the whole thing as I did with running.

PsB
01-01-11, 08:59 AM
Mick, you will need a lot of condition to complete even 100 k with that bike. Tuscan hills can be quite steep IIRC, and there is no such thing as a gentle hill with a 3-speed classic bike, unless you get special gear ratios fitted.

mudlark
01-01-11, 09:56 AM
in my good years i could ride 80 miles including an ascension of the trough of bowland. that was in my 40s. i found an 80 mile ride challenging.

To do any more than that i would need to sort out a proper food intake, water intake, rest and probably a lot more. Riding with no blood sugar and lack of proper hydration is probably life threatening if you have a heart condition.

Without practise your arse will be sore and your legs unable to cope.

JCL
01-01-11, 11:09 AM
Those of us who have blown up and suffered like hell on the bike know what a humbling experience it can be. You never know, Mick may come back a more compassionate fellow :)

mudlark
01-01-11, 12:18 PM
my worst blow up was mountain biking up High Street. I ran out of jiuce just three miles from home on the flat.I had to lie down every few yards...Thankfully a farmhouse had some milk and mars bars.

ClaraBannister
01-01-11, 01:37 PM
You are Julian from the Famous Five and I claim my pre-decimal five pounds.

JCL
01-01-11, 01:39 PM
Nice. Great fun isn't it? My first was when I was 16. Rode the Downs Link and back (Cranleigh to the South Downs) with a load of cat 1/2 roadies on MTB's. Just hammering along bit-and-bit the whole way. We ate something somewhere near the coast then turned around and headed home at the same speed. 20 minutes later I was going walking speed with my head practically resting on my bars. One guy stayed with me and we found a pub where I ate a ton of sugary rubbish but it was useless. 5mph for the 30 remaining gravelly miles. It was nearly dark when I got back. Could barely speak. Good times...

stevec67
01-01-11, 02:05 PM
Those of us who have blown up and suffered like hell on the bike know what a humbling experience it can be. You never know, Mick may come back a more compassionate fellow :)

Bloody hell, there's a thought.

Go for it Mick, you'll be fine. It's just mind over matter. You don't need to do an awful lot of training, just set your mind on it and a man of your mneans will come through. If you can ride 10 miles you can ride 100. If it gets tough just keep asking yourself "Mick Parry, are you a man or a mouse?" and you'll complete it no bother.

cooky1257
01-01-11, 02:13 PM
Go for it Mick, you'll be fine. It's just mind over matter.

Yeah piece of cake.

Still
01-01-11, 04:54 PM
Beware of drivers that lack good eyesight &/or empathy.

glenda
02-01-11, 11:52 AM
Have just read this on the Naim forum . Frankly , after having watched the Youtube link , I think that you would have to be superfit , deluded or in lala land to imagine doing it on a 3 gear bike.

http://italiancyclingjournal.blogspot.com/2009/06/riding-leroica-2008-on-3-speed-pashley.html

Regards

Glenda

SteveB
02-01-11, 02:32 PM
Have just read this on the Naim forum . Frankly , after having watched the Youtube link , I think that you would have to be superfit , deluded or in lala land to imagine doing it on a 3 gear bike.

http://italiancyclingjournal.blogspot.com/2009/06/riding-leroica-2008-on-3-speed-pashley.html

Regards

Glenda

Great article - thanks for posting the link.

"Then, half way to the next checkpoint and about 150km into the race I felt like I hit a wall. My legs continued to weaken but now I also felt as if all my energy was leaking from my body. "

Been there, done that.

mudlark
02-01-11, 02:49 PM
Nice. Great fun isn't it? My first was when I was 16. Rode the Downs Link and back (Cranleigh to the South Downs) with a load of cat 1/2 roadies on MTB's. Just hammering along bit-and-bit the whole way. We ate something somewhere near the coast then turned around and headed home at the same speed. 20 minutes later I was going walking speed with my head practically resting on my bars. One guy stayed with me and we found a pub where I ate a ton of sugary rubbish but it was useless. 5mph for the 30 remaining gravelly miles. It was nearly dark when I got back. Could barely speak. Good times...

after the mars bars I was able to slip stream a tractor and trailer back to my car!!

frightened the do-dah out of me and i didn't do that again.

long-time-dead
02-01-11, 03:52 PM
Mick

Don't be stupid. This will probably kill you in your bullish quest to prove something.

You are retired, have suffered a heart issue and should know better.

You've restored a period cycle and done justice to it. Now, get out on a 5 to 10 mile leisurely ride each day to maintain the quality of your life in the effort to maximise the quantity.

Treat yourself to a glass of red or a restorative malt each evening in celebration of the fact you have enjoyed another day on this mortal coil.

Don't be fooking stupid.

dss
03-01-11, 04:50 AM
L-t-d,

That is a very negative approach is it.

If someone has a perfectly reasonable wish to ride an old push bike 250 miles in 18 hours, who are we to dampen their enthusiasm?

DS

stevec67
03-01-11, 05:25 AM
250 mi/18 hrs? Lance Armstrong would suffer if he tried that! Average about 14 mph? I used to have that as a global average on my bike computer when I had a 6 mile commute. The 14 average is calculated as all time spent moving, ie including the meandering round the car park and stopping off for a drink on the way home stuff, so I generally went slightlyn faster, but I didn't have to keep it going for (gulp) 18 hours.

On the other hand, the more time Mick spends on a bike, the less time he'll have to hang around here. Go for it Mick, you need to clock up at least 2 hours a day, 4-5 days a week, longer sessions on one or two days pw.

ClaraBannister
03-01-11, 05:35 AM
Family legend has it that an ancestor in the 18th century was arrested for debt by the bum-bailiffs, and taken to prison. His attorney was sent for, and advised him that, as a peer's son and a gentleman, he was entitled to have someone else serve his sentence for him. Someone was promptly procured from the lanes and alleyways surrounding the gaol, and promised a life-changing sum of money if he would assume the task, which he agreed to do - whereupon my ancestor returned to his rakish pursuits. History does not relate whether he ever settled with the good man who stepped in for him. If you're still with me, I was about to suggest that Mick finds somebody, a bit handy in the saddle, who would stand in for him.

manicatel
03-01-11, 05:58 AM
I wouldn't bother with the London-Brighton run.
Unless you get away very early, the 1st few miles out of London are at walking pace & the hills slow down the less regular riders & backs everyone up. Its basically a victim of its own success & too many riders take part in it for you to use it as a training run.
However,
the London-to-Cambridge & London-to-Southend rides are all of similar length, ie somewhere between 55-60 miles & held during the June/Juy period. Although still popular & properly supported, they are nowhere near as busy & so going at your own pace is far easier.
There are several other rides you can aim for.
www.bike-events.com
I'd try to get a few friends to come along with you as moral support, pacing guides & someone to chat to at the pit-stops.
I'd agree with the majority here. It ain't gonna be easy, the Brooks saddles need serious breaking in time & "just get out & ride".
Matt.

Paul R
03-01-11, 06:17 AM
250 mi/18 hrs?
The record for riding from London to Edinburgh is just under 18 hours. More than 330mi.

There's loads of eye-watering data at http://www.rra.org.uk/

Paul

demotivated
03-01-11, 07:03 AM
The mens 12 hr record is now 300 miles http://www.cyclingtimetrials.org.uk/Default.aspx?&gv637__gvac=2&tabid=210&gv637__gvff0=M12hr_TT&gv637__gvfl0=0

matt j
04-01-11, 02:01 PM
Mick, you've gone awfully quiet.

I expect nothing less than complete success, anything else will be total failure and I expect you'll be banished from the 'Men of England' dinners quicker than you can say tax-dodging-Tory.

Just think of all the poor, left wing, beardy plebs that will eat up 205km on a vintage bike like it wasn't even there, this should spur you on to total victory.

As for Brooks saddles- I think the break in is a bit of an over egged myth, mine is as comfortable as it was the day I first rode/fitted it. Maybe if you weigh 8 stone and spend all your time climbing out of the saddle they take some breaking in, but for general purpose/fast commuting I never noticed any change.

ClaraBannister
04-01-11, 06:12 PM
I agree. My best saddle is actually a Wrights, of indeterminate vintage, but it's constructed almost identically to a Brooks, and was comfortable from when I acquired it on a secondhand Sun. They don't respond well to getting wet, so I apply a leather oil from the matt side underneath, which soaks through, and you wipe off the surplus from the top. Proofide is Brooks' own preparation, but Mars Oil is a cheaper alternative, and one tin (with applicator brush built into the cap) lasts for ages. If you find steel bicycle clips uncomfortable, it may be worth trying to source some celluloid ones, or you could secure your turn-ups with the leather straps normally used with racing pedal toe clips. Please tell us you don't plan to wear shorts.

James
04-01-11, 09:41 PM
I think Brooks (dis)comfort will be moot after about 20 miles for Mick.

http://gallery.photo.net/photo/8601194-lg.jpg

James

Mick P
05-01-11, 01:23 AM
Chaps

I am having lunch today with a chap who has done the L'Eroica twice and I shall therefore be taking his advice.

Today is day number one of my diet where I aim to go from my current 15.5 stone down to 11.5.

Regards

Mick

Seeker_UK
05-01-11, 02:20 AM
Today is day number one of my diet where I aim to go from my current 15.5 stone down to 11.5.

I'd advise Weight Watchers, Mick - it works extremeny well, promotes healthy eating (ie isn't faddy)

I used them and got from 17.5 stone to my current 11 in 2 years.

If you're looking to lose 4 stone, at two pounds per week, you're looking at 28 weeks but, at your age, expect it to take longer even if you're exercising.

Mick P
05-01-11, 02:25 AM
I'd advise Weight Watchers, Mick - it works extremeny well, promotes healthy eating (ie isn't faddy)

I used them and got from 17.5 stone to my current 11 in 2 years.

If you're looking to lose 4 stone, at two pounds per week, you're looking at 28 weeks but, at your age, expect it to take longer even if you're exercising.

Seeker

I am looking at one pound a week.

Regards

Mick

Seeker_UK
05-01-11, 02:30 AM
Seeker

I am looking at one pound a week.

Regards

Mick

You'll do that just by cycling for half an hour a day. :)

Mick P
05-01-11, 02:33 AM
You'll do that just by cycling for half an hour a day. :)

Seeker

I currently feel good and I want to carry on feeling good, so a slow approach is better than a fast one where a miserable existance is inevitable.

Regards

Mick

Mick P
05-01-11, 09:26 AM
Chaps

I have had a lunch today I wished I never had.

It was with a well known cyclist who is middle aged and wishes to remain anonymous because his name often appears in cycling magazines.

He was very nice and polite but his advice was not to do it this year and probably not until 2012.

He is in his fifties and rides 200 miles a week and reckons the L'Eroica would just about kill me. He was somewhat forceable in his opinion.

So I am going to do the Wiltshire runs and meet up with him again next year for more advice.

I need to get my waistline down to 32" to even think about it.

Woe is me.

Regards

Mick

ClaraBannister
05-01-11, 09:30 AM
Never mind, cycling is the best exercise in the world anyway. There are worse places to do it than Wiltshire and Spain. Much better ones too, but hey.....

Joe Hutch
05-01-11, 09:32 AM
I need to get my waistline down to 32" to even think about it.


Ah well, I'd best not try it this year either in that case.

ClaraBannister
05-01-11, 09:37 AM
Have you ever noticed how many fat people you see riding bicycles? That always puzzles me, unless they've just taken it up.

cooky1257
05-01-11, 09:39 AM
Have you ever noticed how many fat people you see riding bicycles?

Have you ever noticed how many you don't see and were you ever in the vicinity of Swindon last summer?

stevec67
05-01-11, 09:40 AM
I have had a lunch today I wished I never had.
It was with a well known cyclist.
He is in his fifties and rides 200 miles a week and reckons the L'Eroica would just about kill me.
I need to get my waistline down to 32" to even think about it.


I'm hardly surprised. Nevertheless the shorter options are within your grasp. Also, I wouldn't get hung up on waist measurements or bodyweight, they will stabilise if you are fit and it won't matter that much. Enjoy your rides out, wherever they are, and as I said earlier if you get to 50 miles without too many problems then you can start giving it serious consideration.

ClaraBannister
05-01-11, 09:42 AM
Have you ever noticed how many you don't see and were you ever in the vicinity of Swindon last summer?

Not me. Last summer, I was verschwunden.

Mick P
05-01-11, 09:43 AM
Have you ever noticed how many you don't see and were you ever in the vicinity of Swindon last summer?

Cooky

You are becoming such an offensive fellow that I am now making you number two on my ignore list. So from now on I will not see a single word you write.

Not seeing the drivel of another undesirable has been a bonus.

Chaps

I see no point in continuing this thread as Cooky has tried to ruin it and hopefully it will be closed. I certainly will pull out of it.

Regards

Mick

ClaraBannister
05-01-11, 09:45 AM
You'll need to develop a thicker skin on a bicycle, otherwise the white van men will have you in the ditch. What's wrong with a bit of banter?

PS Who was number one? Intrigued.

cooky1257
05-01-11, 09:53 AM
Mick is just trying to get me banned.

All this faked insult and offense, complaining to mods at the drop of a hat, it's his mission, sadly.
Anyone with even half a sense of humour can see there's no malice here.

ClaraBannister
05-01-11, 09:54 AM
Was malice what Christopher Robin went down with?

cooky1257
05-01-11, 09:58 AM
who the f*** is malice?

foxwelljsly
05-01-11, 10:14 AM
Nice. Great fun isn't it? My first was when I was 16. Rode the Downs Link and back (Cranleigh to the South Downs) with a load of cat 1/2 roadies on MTB's. Just hammering along bit-and-bit the whole way. We ate something somewhere near the coast then turned around and headed home at the same speed. 20 minutes later I was going walking speed with my head practically resting on my bars. One guy stayed with me and we found a pub where I ate a ton of sugary rubbish but it was useless. 5mph for the 30 remaining gravelly miles. It was nearly dark when I got back. Could barely speak. Good times...
Sounds like an unladen training ride I did just before a touring trip round Switzerland about 8 years ago. Only about 60 miles, but in blistering heat with very little sustenance - I collapsed by a service station 10 miles from the end and hoovered up 3 cans of coke and 2 bags of Haribo and my strength returned.

I have since discovered that a continuous low level supply of caffeine is the long distance cyclists best friend.

whatsnext
05-01-11, 10:23 AM
Mick is just trying to get me banned.

All this faked insult and offense, complaining to mods at the drop of a hat, it's his mission, sadly.
Anyone with even half a sense of humour can see there's no malice here.

Cooky
You should know better than to taunt a wounded animal or a person who is dumb enough to publicly display their lack of grasp of reality having had their dreams shown to be dreams. They both lash out in pain.

If you are on the ignore list he wont be able to moan about what you post - a plus me thinks.

Tim Jones
05-01-11, 10:37 AM
Mick -

I don't know if you're still reading this thread, but when I saw your original post I though 'hang on, that thing's actually seriously tough...' This is the one where they ride up the unpaved white chalk mountain roads on 15kg bikes isn't it? The one the pros do as a tough training ride. No wonder he-who-shall-not-be-named advised you against it.

This is probably the way you're thinking anyway, but as a bit of advice, the byword for increasing the duration of your rides is to go up in increments of about 10 or 15% a week. You're probably at the stage where 10 or 20 miles isn't too tough, so aim to go for 50 by mid Feb. Then do some charity rides, etc.

Weight loss takes time - at least three months or so - and is only achieved by creating a small disparity between your calorific intake and output. You can do all this in a very scientific way involving a heart rate monitor, and a scale to weight your pasta, etc, but it doesn't have to be complicated. Without neglecting the all-important need to fuel up before a long ride and eat after it, just cycle a bit more and eat a bit less, and do so consistently.

Tim

Paul R
05-01-11, 11:18 AM
Mick, if you want to go for a ride sometime, get in touch.

Paul

dss
05-01-11, 11:26 AM
So it was all a wind up after all is it.

At least this particular one is over there.

I wonder what the next one will be?

DS

Tony L
05-01-11, 11:34 AM
He is in his fifties and rides 200 miles a week and reckons the L'Eroica would just about kill me. He was somewhat forceable in his opinion.

That's very good advice IMO - I posted something similar a week or so ago but deleted it as I felt it was not as well worded as I'd like and it came across as overly-negative. If I were you I'd set your sights on doing the 38km route. It would be something to build up towards and I'm certain would be great fun. A realistic, worthwhile and enjoyable first target.

Tony.

NeilR
05-01-11, 11:34 AM
Mick, if you want to go for a ride sometime, get in touch.

Paul

I'll join you both for a ride too, if you want.

I've started training with the aim of entering some sportive events this year. up to 60 miles so far.

PFM cycling group?

Paul R
05-01-11, 01:13 PM
If I were you I'd set your sights on doing the 38km route.
I think Mick can be slightly more ambitious at this stage. But the important thing should be to be in Italy in October riding his bike and experiencing an event. I'm seriously tempted.

I'll join you both for a ride too, if you want.
Excellent.

I've started training with the aim of entering some sportive events this year.
I'm committed to the 'Dragon Ride' in June...

Paul

matt j
05-01-11, 01:34 PM
Mick, get in touch with your local CTC group and go out on some rides with them, they usually cater for all sorts of distances from short and slow up to 600km Audax runs.

SteveB
05-01-11, 01:49 PM
Mick.

Don't pull out of the thread. You've got a great goal and whether you do L'eriocia this year or in 2017 it will still be a sweet achievement. There has been some good advice on here so use it to get out, start training and have a great time on two wheels while knowing that it's all steps towards that Italian adventure.

Mick P
05-01-11, 04:07 PM
Chaps

I think the spirit of this thread has been killed with one or two acid and personal comments and I will just let it die.

Mrs Mick and I are coming up for our 40th aniversary and I was intending on taking a month on touring Italy, the usual Rome, Venice and Florence thingy with the L'Eroica thrown in for good measure.

I certainly had a few facts of life thrown at me lunch time and I just need a few weeks to work out whether to take part in the event this year or not. It seems a bit defeatist to go all the way over there just to partake in one of the minor races. My inclination is to go for the big one or not at all.

I may start a new thread in a couple of weeks time starting with a few pics of the hopefully by then restored bicycle and take it from there.

There are a few bike clubs in the area and I will almost certainly join one of them as it will provide a bit of stimulus in keeping up with the mob.

Thanks for all the advice. It has been appreciated.

Regards

Mick

Tony L
05-01-11, 04:46 PM
It seems a bit defeatist to go all the way over there just to partake in one of the minor races. My inclination is to go for the big one or not at all.

I don't see it as that at all, though I've never understood the 'alpha-male' sports thing, I just don't think like that, and have always considered it a bit daft to be honest. To my mind this would be a great opportunity to cycle in some beautiful surroundings with like-minded people on interesting vintage bicycles. Stop being so bloody competitive - you are retired now - chill out a bit! A shorter event will be fun, informative and still damn good exercise. What more do you want?

Tony.

Mick P
05-01-11, 05:03 PM
I don't see it as that at all, though I've never understood the 'alpha-male' sports thing, I just don't think like that, and have always considered it a bit daft to be honest. To my mind this would be a great opportunity to cycle in some beautiful surroundings with like-minded people on interesting vintage bicycles. Stop being so bloody competitive - you are retired now - chill out a bit! A shorter event will be fun, informative and still damn good exercise. What more do you want?

Tony.

TO WIN THE BIG RACE

stevec67
05-01-11, 05:08 PM
Haha, fat chance, when there will be men there 30 years your junior who cycle further every weekend than you do in 6 months and have done for the last 20 years. Face facts, you simply haven't put the time in. We all make choices in life, and these choices make certain things possible en route and exclude other things.

Mick P
05-01-11, 05:09 PM
Haha, fat chance, when there will be men there 30 years your junior who cycle further every weekend than you do in 6 months and have done for the last 20 years. Face facts, you simply haven't put the time in. We all make choices in life, and these choices make certain things possible en route and exclude other things.

Steve

I had that fact rammed down my throat ten times over at midday today.

Regards

Mick

stevec67
05-01-11, 05:15 PM
So accept that you aren't the next Lance Armstrong and go along to do something you are capable of, in a beautiful setting. A middling distance on the day will be a great ride.
Regards
Steve

Mick P
05-01-11, 05:21 PM
So accept that you aren't the next Lance Armstrong and go along to do something you are capable of, in a beautiful setting. A middling distance on the day will be a great ride.
Regards
Steve

Steve

It is not nice knowing you are crap, it is worse being told you are crap, it is even worse having to accept that you are crap. It will happen to you one day, so please allow me to have my sulk.

Regards

Mick

cooky1257
05-01-11, 05:27 PM
Chaps

I think the spirit of this thread has been killed with one or two acid and personal comments and I will just let it die.





You could always just do the downhill bits.

stevec67
05-01-11, 05:46 PM
Steve

It is not nice knowing you are crap, it is worse being told you are crap, it is even worse having to accept that you are crap. It will happen to you one day, so please allow me to have my sulk.

Regards

Mick

It already has mate, courtesy of some tosser not looking where he was going and putting me in hospital and my bike in a skip. A year after that event I'm not back at work and still feel like death warmed up more than I should. I'll never do again what I was able to do pre Nov 09, whether in the world of mountaineering, cycling or in work. Those are unfortunate facts. I'm not sulking, and this summer I enjoyed some great trips to Pembrokeshire and Scotland, with and without bikes. I have had to revise my expectations downwards though, and bear in mind I've been an outdoor sportsman all my life and I really have put the time in.

Now have your sulk, then dry your eyes, get in touch with the local bike club and go out with them. You'll enjoy it.

ClaraBannister
05-01-11, 05:52 PM
I'm here to tell you that Pembrokeshire is the best place in the entire world to cycle. I used to live in Cilgerran, and I have fond memories of cycling to Llechryd and along the lanes beside the Afon Teifi. In the height of summer, I could ride for hours and never see a single car. Happy times.

JCL
05-01-11, 06:18 PM
You could always just do the downhill bits.

LOL!

NeilR
06-01-11, 12:43 AM
Don't be so defeatist Mick.

Going over there to do say a 50 mile middle distance will still be demanding and it will be a great experience. You'll have a real sense of achievement when you finish it.

cooky1257
06-01-11, 01:24 AM
LOL!

I wasn't joking though it has to be said the teasing started on page one btw.

In the OP Mick alludes to dying in the process so while the reality is uncomfortable it can hardly be surprising.

60 year old, obese, heart condition, I'd be asking my doctor not chaps on a hifi forum.

Stop being such a prima donna.

Turn this insurmountable challenge to some good, set yourself a realistic distance, get sponsored per mile completed and raise some cash for a worthwhile charitable cause-eg British Heart Foundation and do your bit for Dave and his Big Society.

Think of the kudos down the local Conservative Association.

matt j
06-01-11, 05:57 AM
so please allow me to have my sulk.

Regards

Mick

Ha! After all the snidey pops you've taken at people who haven't been as successful and earned as much money as you, dismissing them as brain dead idiots, it's not surprising they're queueing up to give you stick about this!

Stick to the amateur/weaklings distance, we don't want you keeling over.

chainrule
06-01-11, 08:24 AM
Steve

It is not nice knowing you are crap, it is worse being told you are crap, it is even worse having to accept that you are crap. It will happen to you one day, so please allow me to have my sulk.

Regards

Mick

Mick, everyone is crap in the beginning. How many times have you've ridden since the start of this thread? A month of riding and you could be out of the crap stage. Nothing comes without toil.

Unregistered
06-01-11, 11:51 AM
Downhill MTBing, Mick. You can get an uplift service to the top of the hill and then gravity will take care of the rest, so you don't need to be fit.

This could be you... (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5MYx71UXKw)

Best. Commentary. Ever.

sean99
06-01-11, 12:24 PM
Stick to the amateur/weaklings distance, we don't want you keeling over.

We don't?

matt j
06-01-11, 12:33 PM
Not unless there will be someone there to video it.

Mr Cat
06-01-11, 02:57 PM
when I was younger - one way that I got really fit was to ride locally - in jesmond dene...I could ride there all day knowing that if I was totally shagged out - home was 5 minutes away, it's seemed like a 'mental' block that allowed me to do long rides knowing that I was capable...I suggest you do lots of local routes

NeilR
06-01-11, 03:02 PM
I'm committed to the 'Dragon Ride' in June...

Paul

Not quite sure yet which country I'll be in come June. I might be tempted though.

SteveB
06-01-11, 03:14 PM
New Forest Rattler (http://www.newforestrattler.co.uk/) for me, 47 mile route.

Mick, could be a good intermediate goal for you, it's a lovely rolling route with only one short sharp hill.

I did 3h10 in 2009, 3h09 in 2010 with wet roads and cattlegrids slowing me down somewhat. Aiming for 3h this time around.

NeilR
06-01-11, 03:32 PM
I'm thinking of entering the wiggle New Forest sportive in April with my GF. we'll probably do the 50 mile route as she hasn't done much riding recently. Should be quite a good day out.

glenda
29-01-11, 05:51 AM
On BBC4 tomorrow night is the documentary Death on the Mountain - the life and death story of Tommy Simpson who , as most roadies know , died on Mont Ventoux during a stage of the Tour.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0074rgb

Off for a ride now.

Regards

Glenda

stevec67
29-01-11, 06:24 AM
Brilliant, thanks for that. I'll watch it.

Mick P
29-01-11, 06:30 AM
Chaps

This programme is a repeat and it is the one that inspired me to do L'Eroica.

It is well worth the watch.

It will make you feel guilty for being a fat pig whilst you watch the TV sipping your glass of beer or whatever.

I have been cycling more but I don't like the cold weather which has been freezing on occassions and I limit myself to 10 miles on the Pashley until the weather improves.

I am eating like a pig, I am scoffing mince pies for England and yet my weight has dropped by 8 measured pounds. My trousers are definately slacker, so it is having a good effect.

Regards

Mick

matt j
29-01-11, 09:02 AM
Cycling fitness is a strange thing, it creeps up on you without you noticing it.

Unless you're an uber nerd and know what gear you usually ride in for every section of your route, you don't notice (or at least I didn't) when you start creeping the gears up and slight increases in average speed.

Keep at it Mick, I enjoy this time of year so long as you have the right gear. I've just done a quick 20 miles (quick for me, not some of this lot) I was going to go for my 45 mile route but I misjudged the weather and didn't put on my base layer, I soon realised my knees and legs were too cold and stiff to do any more than the 20.

Mr Cat
29-01-11, 11:50 AM
yeah, i'm still doing my 50 pressups a day and now doing deadlifts and squats etc...I've a need to be strong! :)

andrew d
29-01-11, 12:04 PM
The Tommy Simpson programme is certainly worth a watch. I hear that Shane Meadows wants to do a film based on the life of Simpson.

glenda
29-01-11, 12:26 PM
Quite a few years ago , me and a mate went on a cycling weekend in Sheffield ( Snake Pass , Glossop , etc - absolutely brilliant !) and called into the Tommy Simpson exhibition in his home village - Harwarth (? - please correct me ) on the way back to South Wales. They had some of the letters he had written to his mum from France - I started reading them and had to leave the room as I was beginning to choke back the tears.
I have grovelled my way up a few Alpine climbs - Izoard , Cormet de Roseland , Courchevel but must have a crack at Mont Ventoux at some stage.

Regards

Tony

johnhunt
29-01-11, 03:35 PM
I'm not huge on cycling but did get my 8yo a bike for her b'day. 260 ukp , i had to leave the shop and sit on the wall outside with my head between my knees.

On the getting sweaty front though I'm just starting week five of my london marathon training schedule . i've run 145 miles over the last four.

SteveB
30-01-11, 02:43 PM
Paris-Roubaix, anyone?

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