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  #31  
Old 14-02-17, 02:53 PM
linnfomaniac83 linnfomaniac83 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julf View Post
You could simply get an amp with tone controls...
No real need if you have the right kit in the first place. I just sent the focals back, realised that I was still completely happy with the speakers I'd been using for several years and saved myself over 5k.
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  #32  
Old 14-02-17, 03:02 PM
ampman ampman is offline
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Heybrook HB1 - headache inducing.
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  #33  
Old 14-02-17, 03:23 PM
DNM DNM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julf View Post
You could simply get an amp with tone controls...
Don't be silly they mangle the sound
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  #34  
Old 14-02-17, 03:32 PM
misterdog misterdog is offline
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Quad Electrostatics, when the humidity gets too high and the lights are low.

The lightning effects are really bright...
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  #35  
Old 14-02-17, 03:41 PM
davidsrsb davidsrsb is offline
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Depends on what you mean by bright, raised extreme treble >10kHz or presence region 4~6kHz where sibilance lives
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  #36  
Old 14-02-17, 07:00 PM
Snoflo Snoflo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by radamel View Post
Some speakers when not properly driven can sound awful. With good quality amplification the exact same speakers may sound great.
Thiel loudspeakers (the original Jim Thiel designs) are like that.
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  #37  
Old 14-02-17, 07:11 PM
Yank Yank is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minio View Post
I'm not sure if being bright is a bad thing for everyone considering that personal hearing chacteristics vary among people of different ages, for example.
This doesn't make any sense to me. Even if you have hearing loss, you still use the same ears to hear the real world as you do for reproduced music, so an overly-bright presentation won't sound more real.
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  #38  
Old 14-02-17, 08:49 PM
cstanpfm cstanpfm is offline
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When playing a frequency sweep from 10Hz to 20KHz, I noticed that I cannot hear frequency around 16KHz while somewhere 17KHz onwards becomes audible again until some where near 18KHz to 19KHz where it becomes too soft to hear.

Maybe there are others like me that can't hear certain high frequencies.
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  #39  
Old 14-02-17, 09:23 PM
Cereal Killer Cereal Killer is online now
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  #40  
Old 14-02-17, 09:41 PM
davidsrsb davidsrsb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cstanpfm View Post
When playing a frequency sweep from 10Hz to 20KHz, I noticed that I cannot hear frequency around 16KHz while somewhere 17KHz onwards becomes audible again until some where near 18KHz to 19KHz where it becomes too soft to hear.
Notches happen, often from industrial exposure, but it could be the speaker you are using having a notch or going into break up at 17kHz and generating sub-harmonics
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  #41  
Old 14-02-17, 10:39 PM
Snoflo Snoflo is offline
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There was a research letter in The Lancet in the late 90s that showed that some persons can hear all the way up to 26kHz. I sent John Atkinson of Stereophile a copy. I wonder if I can dig that up somewhere? Anyway, oil-can resonance for aluminium tweeters is usually around 20 - 25KHz so maybe that's why some people find these tweeters objectionable? Dunno.
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  #42  
Old 14-02-17, 10:52 PM
Snoflo Snoflo is offline
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http://m.jn.physiology.org/content/83/6/3548

Similar study. We don't really 'hear' sounds above 20kHz but our brains perceive them fwiw.
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  #43  
Old 15-02-17, 12:05 AM
matt j matt j is offline
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I find brightness volume dependant, at the sort of levels I listen at then nothing is terribly bright.

I once owned some Neats that I thought sounded wonderful, when I sold them I delivered them to the new owner who promptly hooked them up to an awful Krell thingy and cranked up some metal, they were painful to say the least.
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  #44  
Old 15-02-17, 12:58 AM
Joe Hutch Joe Hutch is offline
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A lot depends on the room. I imagine many speakers that sound over-bright in a sparsely furnished room would sound fine in a more heavily furnished one. Similarly a speaker that sounds fine in the former might sound dull in the latter.
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  #45  
Old 15-02-17, 01:11 AM
mattgbell mattgbell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snoflo View Post
http://m.jn.physiology.org/content/83/6/3548

Similar study. We don't really 'hear' sounds above 20kHz but our brains perceive them fwiw.
This paper has been debunked. The speaker used in the experiment may have been producing noise in the audible range.
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