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BMW run flat alternatives

Discussion in 'off topic' started by stevec67, Mar 20, 2020.

  1. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    My parents have a 2013 520d with RFTs. As they wear out they would like to replace them with something better and cheaper, basically a set of conventional tyres. In addition a 50 mile run flat capability is SFA use at night in the middle of nowhere.

    I've had a look and the wheel well is taken up with battery. There is no space even for a space saver wheelbarrow tyre, as far as I can see.

    What are the alternatives? Taking up half the boot with a spare is a non starter. I have heard of people carrying a can of gloop and a portble compressor, is this a viable solution?
     
  2. SteveS1

    SteveS1 I heard that, pardon?

    I used the space saver spare when I had an F10 - yes it takes up some boot space but the boot is large. I wasn't prepared to cover continental miles with run-flats or gloop or even both. The latest RFTs are a lot better FWIW and I haven't bothered change them on my current F32.
     
  3. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    It strikes me that RFTs are a bad solution to a non problem. My last puncture was 100 miles from home at 7pm. Yes, the run home on a space saver at 50mph was very boring, but it got me home and to the tyre shop the next day. RFTs would have seen me on a breakdown truck.
     
  4. Woodface

    Woodface pfm Member

    Stick with the run flats, the prices do keep coming down. They will have breakdown cover. Cheap tyres are a false economy.
     
  5. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    I'm not talking about cheap tyres, I'm talking about non RFT versions of the same tyre, which are cheaper and happen to handle better, according to those who have used both. Please don't turn this into another "anyone who doesn't buy the most expensive brand of tyres in the shop is driving a death trap and should be killed for daring to endanger me and other road users" bunfight.
     
    Nic Robinson and I.D.C. like this.
  6. clivem2

    clivem2 pfm Member

    Goop and compressor is what comes with my BMW and our Mini too. After 11 years on RFTs it's been great with my new car to get away from RFTs (it was an option to delete them). The time to worry is when there's a catastrophic failure of a tyre...which is a rare occurrence but never say never I suppose.

    My BMW came with Pirelli P Zero non-RFTs, which are very decent. The best handling tyres are probably Michelin Pilot Sport 4...also the most expensive though the Pirellis aren't low-cost either.
     
  7. SteveS1

    SteveS1 I heard that, pardon?

    I get that, but my latest experience of them on the F32 is a whole world better than back in 2011 with the F10. The handling and ride of the F32 is superb. RFTs on a Mini, especially a sport version like my friend has is a nightmare. Not comparable. I would have those off in a heartbeat and stick some Michelins on with gloop and a compressor in the boot. With the F10 you can get BMW's space saver, I only sold mine recently and got back what I paid. It was unused.
     
  8. Woodface

    Woodface pfm Member

    I wasn't. Just buy the non-run flat version of the same tyre then, seems pointless to ask for other views when you've already made your mind up.
     
  9. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    Read it again. I'm asking how you get round the puncture problem if you change to non RFTs. Thanks again.
     
  10. PaulMB

    PaulMB pfm Member

    I'd buy 4 Continentals, and a cheap wheel of the right size and any old tyre and bung it in the boot. I don't see why this should be a "non-starter." Incidentally, this is a classic case of car manufacturers imposing, forcing, something on the buyer. As if anyone in their right mind would "opt" for a car with no spare!
     
    SteveS1 likes this.
  11. clivem2

    clivem2 pfm Member

    Even though the latest RFTs are much improved....some improvement is also due to the lastest suspension setups. You can take into account both handling and harshness. It's the harshness on coarsely surfaced roads which will the concern of most non-racing drivers.
     
  12. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    Thanks, so non RFT, can of goo and compressor is an approved solution then? You're right about the catastrophic failure possibility, but I imagine that if that happens with an RFT you are just as screwed.
     
  13. thebiglebowski

    thebiglebowski pfm Member

    I have the goop and compressor but was warned it writes off the tyre even if the puncture could be repaired.
     
  14. clivem2

    clivem2 pfm Member

    Yes goop and compressor were supplied as standard by BMW on my X3, there's no spare wheel.
     
  15. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    Because a 275/40/18 tyre (or whatever similar size they are) is a big old thing in the boot and probably stops you putting (say) 2 suitcases in. Certainly it looked that way to me when I eyed it up, and I've had similar experiences with other cars. A Jag X type loses half the boot if you toss in another spare wheel!
     
  16. clivem2

    clivem2 pfm Member

    I thought the tyre should be ok but the TPMS won't be. That said the chance of needing to use the goop is something to assess. Most punctures are slow and won't need goop, just topping up pressure but again, never say never.

    RFTs usually wear faster and are more expensive so that's part of a cost justification too.
     
  17. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    I've heard this. I think the broader picture is that cleaning out the goo and making a proper repair is an absolutely horrible, filthy and time consuming job so "it's a write off mate" is an easier solution.
     
  18. martin clark

    martin clark pinko bodger

    Yes it is - I kept this in the back of my B10 while getting rims straightened (so fullsize spare in use on the car), and actually - didn't need it, but lived there the life of my ownership, then used on mountain bike rather well...
    • 1 pint of Slime Tubeless Tyre Sealant (it's water-based, so can just be washed-out if the tyre is repairable - don't use the aerosol foaming types!)
    • 1 Ring air compressor (a 600 or better)
    C. £35 total bought online, very compact, and the Slime doesn't appear to have a shelf life iirc - its just an aqueous suspension of fibres.

    Its enough to get you to a place of tyre repair. Obvs no use if you kerb it and slash the tyrewall, but otherwise - pretty viable.
     
  19. Woodface

    Woodface pfm Member

    It can only be gloop or spare tyre but gloop wont work if the tyre is shredded. You can get a compressor which will run off the 12v socket. I ran a Honda accord for a while, no spare, just gloop & compressor; had a blow out & needed to be towed. This is why, on balance, I would stick with RFTs. I am not a fan personally but no manufacturer seems to bother with spares.
     
  20. clivem2

    clivem2 pfm Member

    That Slime sealant looks good! Much cleaner to use. Thanks Martin.
     

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