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Brooks B17 "Competition Standard" saddle, vintage?

Discussion in 'off topic' started by Rob998, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. Snufkin

    Snufkin pfm Member

    I believe the swift Titanium is a bit of an acquired taste although they do look lovely. I have several B17's including a titanium railed one; that is a comfortable saddle. However my most treasured is a 20 year old B17 made for Brompton. The nice touch is it has Brompton stamped into the side although you can barely see that now as I must have cycled more than 20,000 miles on it.
     
  2. kitemap

    kitemap Immoderate

    I've only had B17s myself and I'm ashamed to say that my AM90 has never been on a bike so I couldn't comment on it's comfort. Hopefully it will be put on one soonish, once I can afford a Moulton worthy enough.
     
  3. beammeup

    beammeup pfm Member

    I don't know how I found this old thread snippet but - you having a Coventry Eagle comes as a coincidence as there is a pale blue CE near me for £40 with Reynolds 531 tubing - looks a bit rusty but - are they generally good bikes? I was tempted to buy this one, give it a clean and good service if it's worth while doing.
     
  4. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    Buy it. Subject to it being your size and you wanting to use it at of course, but that's a steal. Buy it.
     
  5. beammeup

    beammeup pfm Member

    OK - will do then - but actually I do have some photos of it before I do a rush buy - perhaps you can enlighten me further on this particular one (and yes the bike is not clean)!

    Photos coming in a min ...
     
  6. beammeup

    beammeup pfm Member

    Here you go... where Eagles Dare ...

    [​IMG]

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  7. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    Not had much use, note the lack of wear where the chain goes over the chainstay. This normally sees wear to the paint as the bike goes over bumps. One thing - there is a rusty spot on the downtube just above the bottom bracket. Just check that this is only superficial and isn't chewing a hole in the tube.
     
  8. Rob998

    Rob998 Scimmia Nordoccidentale

    Needs a nice saddle that does...
     
  9. beammeup

    beammeup pfm Member

    Is it still worth the £40?

    Also, is this a particular model (the writing has mostly worn off) - looks like a tourer
     
  10. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    Of course it's worth 40 notes. Go out and buy a wheel, you've spent more than that. God knows the model, as you say it looks touring geo metry.
     
  11. glancaster

    glancaster In the silicon vale

    I concur. Definitely worth the £40. A fine utilty/pub bike, at the very least, possibly better.

    Also agree that the saddle doesn't really suit it, but a saddle is a very personal thing. If it's comfortable for you, I'd keep it.

    One perhaps non-obvious thing I'd do for any used bike is check the chain isn't stretched. A shop can do this for you, or sell you a chain measuring tool for a few quid. If stretched, get a new chain fitted because a stretched one will tend to skip and gradually destroy the rest of the drivetrain.

    Also, check gears and brakes are adjusted OK, but that's more obvious.
     
  12. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    Correct, but anyone can test a chain. Measure 12 links of a tight chain, rivet centre to rivet centre, a new chain measures 12" exactly. (yes, inches. Not 12 x 25mm but 12 inches.) An acceptably worn chain is 12 1/16, it should be replaced at this point. 12 1/8 is excessive and it has probably buggered the cassette. More than this and the whole system is so worn that the chances are that everything is buggered, in which case you may as well run it until it claps and replace the whole bloody lot, because replacing the chain is going to have the thing skipping under drive.
     
  13. glancaster

    glancaster In the silicon vale

    When measuring, I would worry that I hadn't sighted it correctly, as a 1/16th over 12 inches isn't much, particularly when in a dimly lit garage, trying not to get oil on the measure. Once I got the tool, I found it simple to use, and it only cost a few quid. Consequently, I now check more often.

    On a bike like that, it'll be a freewheel rather than a cassette. In spite of what I wrote above, it's amazing how tough some of those old ones can be. I confess I never realised that chains wore out so quickly until quite recently :oops:. Before the penny dropped, I'd completely destroyed the whole drivetrain on a modern hybrid bike over the course of a few years (about 10k miles), but over a longer period of use the freewheel on a 1970s bike was still OK. However, I can't guarantee that all freewheels would put up with that level of abuse. I still think it is better to be safe than sorry.

    Kind regards

    - Garry
     
  14. beammeup

    beammeup pfm Member

    I think it's more down to wanting the chance to own a good quality vintage bike. I've not heard of Coventry Eagle before - so putting some time and effort into something that good quality is more important for me to consider.
     

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