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hackercap cap 6 modules or equivalent ?

Discussion in 'd.i.y.' started by pem1, Nov 26, 2019.

  1. pem1

    pem1 Active Member

  2. Mike Hanson

    Mike Hanson Really?

    That would be fine, with one small caveat. With the CAP6 and HackerCap boards, you have the option to place small inductors between each set of caps (4 inductors for 6 caps). These are said to make the power supply quieter, although many people don't bother with them. Even Les at Avondale leaves them out sometimes.

    Another issue to consider is whether the capacitors are of sufficient quality. It's hard to judge for certain.
     
  3. Mike Hanson

    Mike Hanson Really?

  4. pem1

    pem1 Active Member

    I have my fingers crossed I get some hackercap boards from the group buy haven't heard out yet ? Thanks why I am looking for alternatives mike ?
     
  5. 337alant

    337alant Negatively Biased

    Mike Jog on with your cheap skating build but you will never know what you are are missing out on M8

    Alan
     
    Chops54 likes this.
  6. Mike Hanson

    Mike Hanson Really?

    I heard what you're saying, Alan. :) I'm not trying to knock it out of the park with every amp. It's nice to get a sense of different performance from different decisions.
    • I've had a truckload of different Naim-style amps, including at least the NAP110, NAP140, NAP250, and NAP135s.
    • I upgraded my NAP110 with NCC200s and then the Avondale 110 PS.
    • The amp I just finished building for my friend is a step up from that upgraded NAP110, with a 330VA transformer, single Cap6, and recent NCC200s.
    • The next amp that I'm building (the one with two CAP6 boards, but a single secondary winding on the 500VA transformer) is better again, and destined for my family room.
    • My main system is in my office, with a set of Voyagers running QUDOS boards.
    • I'm probably going to build a NCC300 amp with 4 transformers and CAP boards, and no compromises will occur there.
    Each step is a bit of fun, and an opportunity to learn a bit more about this very complicated hobby. I appreciate getting everyone's input, and I try to settle on a reasonable approach for each aspect.
     
  7. Yank

    Yank Bulbous Also Tapered

  8. Mike Hanson

    Mike Hanson Really?

    Yeah, that's definitely less than the typical 20-30K per side. However, supplies for the front end section of the amp don't need as much capacitance. I wonder if it would be better in that use case?
     
  9. pem1

    pem1 Active Member

  10. Mike Hanson

    Mike Hanson Really?

    That's a slightly different approach again.

    The simplest configuration is a bank of capacitors in parallel, such that they're acting like one bigger capacitor. That's the configuration of this one that you mentioned earlier. It's the same as using a HackerCap or CAP6 with wire links between each bank of caps, which many people use.

    The option used more generally around these parts is CLCLC (that's three capacitors, with an inductor between each step of capacitors). This configuration adds a bit of high frequency filtering between each stage.

    A third option is CRCRC (three capacitors with a resistor between each step). That's the one used in your ebay link above (which is actually CRCRCRC, because it has four caps on each side.). This can cause a slight drop in voltage between each stage. I don't enough about filtering circuits to explain when this approach is better/worse.

    Looking closer, I see that there are only 2 resistors per side in that link, so I'm not sure of the actual circuit. Perhaps it's CRC+CRC. As I stated, I'm not familiar enough with filtering circuits to guess further.
     
  11. sq225917

    sq225917 situation engineer

    I always prefer clcrc
     
  12. john.luckins

    john.luckins pfm Member

    I prefer lclc...but it means a higher voltage transformer is needed and a near constant current load, i.e. class A
     
  13. pem1

    pem1 Active Member

    Getting very technical for a thick pie eater from wigan lol
     
  14. Mike Hanson

    Mike Hanson Really?

    Easiest answer: CLCLC is the most common around here, but CCC (no inductors) is also common. Avoid others, as you may end up affecting other aspects of the system (e.g. transformer voltage).

    IOW, hope for a HackerCap or CAP6, which easily supports CLCLC. Failing that, your first option above is a suitable fallback.
     
  15. pem1

    pem1 Active Member

    Thanks mike I get it now m8
     
  16. pem1

    pem1 Active Member

    Or hope my order comes through on the hackercap 6 group buy fingers crossed
     
  17. sq225917

    sq225917 situation engineer

    Should be fine gents, they have slots between the caps so you can fit whatever you like. My preference for codec is that is allows easy voltage trimming but still have cap as last element to keep impedance down as seen by the following stage. Dhl have been an utter clusterf-ck for delivery, failing twice so ill pick them up tomorrow from the depot.

    Should be enough spares to go round
     
    Mike Hanson likes this.
  18. Yank

    Yank Bulbous Also Tapered

    autocorrect?
     
  19. sq225917

    sq225917 situation engineer

  20. Mike Hanson

    Mike Hanson Really?

    I'm quite new to this. Do you mean this can be used to decrease the supply's output voltage when the transformer's voltage is too high? If so, how does one determine the necessary resistance value given input and desired output, and how much power (W) would that resistor dissipate?
     

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