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Second Hand Hybrid Cycles

Discussion in 'off topic' started by Brown Bottle, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. I need to reduce my Cholesterol so I thought I'd kill two birds and lose some weight at the same time. The only form of solo exercise I've ever enjoyed, other than walking, is cycling. I used to have a Mountain Bike which I last used about 10 years ago but spent 90% of the time on the roads. I'm looking to buy a hybrid for mainly road riding.

    Looking at a few websites well reviewed bikes seem to start at £500.00 new. I want to spend about £350.00 so hopefully I'll be able to get something decent 2nd hand for that price.

    What should I be looking out for?

    Cheers BB
     
  2. sean99

    sean99 pfm Member

    Do you still have your mountain bike ? Was it a decent bike (£400+) ? If yes to both then I think the only thing you need is new slick tires. Something like this:

    https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/schwalbe-kojak-slick-tyre-raceguard/rp-prod24794

    (plus possibly narrower / lighter inner tubes)
    And maybe a decent track pump to get them up to 80+PSI.

    I would only buy a new hybrid if the old bike is cheap / knackered / sold - otherwise high pressure slick tires will make the world of difference.
     
  3. foxwelljsly

    foxwelljsly Keep Music Vile

    Yeah, even if you buy a new bike, I'd be sorely tempted to spend your budget on a mountain bike with front suspension and pony up a few extra quid on some skinny tyres.
     
  4. I no longer own the Mountain Bike.

    Cheers BB
     
  5. jack8000

    jack8000 pfm Member

    The Boardman hybrids are pretty good IMO, should be able to get a decent secondhand one for £350
     
  6. Copperjacket

    Copperjacket pfm Member

    If you are lucky you will have a good 2nd hand charity bike shop near you that can help you out and let you try before you buy.
    I would tend to avoid front suspension for road use. Specialized, Kona and GT are all good makes.
     
  7. mjw

    mjw pfm Member

    BB, also, if you’re near somewhere like Rutland, Clumber Park, anywhere they hire day bikes, get in at the end of summer. All those places are also a bike shop so an ex-hire bike can be a well-serviced bargain. Got a nice hybrid for my missus at Clumber.
    Personally I wouldn’t have sus forks on a road bike. The bike shop at Clumber put me a new steel fork on my Gary Fisher Zebrano and returned the old sus. fork, all for £45. There just didn’t seem any point doing it myself.
     
  8. glancaster

    glancaster In the silicon vale

    You might get something decent new for £350, in a sale, or ex-demo, but should get something very good for that secondhand.

    I agree with previous posters that sus forks on a road bike are not necessary for most people. They add weight, for one thing, the enemy of fun cycling. However, if you have rough tracks you want to negotiate, or need a smoother ride for some reason, you might be an exception.

    Some things to consider for a bike of that price:
    • A good bike is light, so pick it up, maybe with one hand, and see how it feels. Without mudguards, racks and other extras, anything over 12kg is heavy, and anything under 10kg is light.
    • Frame material: aluminium with a carbon fork is a good compromise for weight, feel, and price. All aluminium is a bit cheaper but can give a harsh ride. All steel is typically a sign of a heavy and low-end bike, but a few manufacturers (e.g. Genesis) still use better quality Reynolds steel to make really comfortable bikes, more in the classic style.
    • Consider do you actually want a drop bar road bike, which is faster and more aerodynamic, and better supports multiple riding positions, so better for long road rides? Some people adapt very quickly to it, others prefer to stick with flat bars, which admittedly are better for manoeuvrability in traffic. Road bikes tend to be less hardy than hybrids though.
    • Go for at least 8 gears on the back of the bike. Fewer than that is really quite low end nowadays. You might get 9 or 10 in budget.
    • At the front, the chainset, you'll usually get either triple chainrings or a double. I prefer a double (or even a single) for simplicity. However, if you have steep hills to ride up, and think you might struggle, probably go for the range of a triple.
    • Some may have disc brakes, which brake against a rotor attached to the wheel hub rather than on the rim of the wheel like more traditional rim brakes. They brake better, partly because they don't have to slice through the crud that accumulates on the rim, but weigh and cost more.
    • Tyres. No tread needed for road use on a bike, even in the wet, and really chunky tread will noticeably slow you down. Width is a trade-off: wide for comfort, narrow for speed. This holds down to about 28mm, with little benefit in going lower.
    • Remember to budget for accessories. A helmet. At least one good D-lock. Mudguards if riding regularly in the wet. Lights. Maybe a back pannier rack and the panniers to go on it. Perhaps some cycling clothing. A basic cycle toolkit. It all adds up.
    • All other things being equal, I would prefer a bike with a good frame but lower-end components over a bike with a lacklustre frame and better components. The former can be upgraded later on, but the latter cannot.
    • You can only really tell if you like a bike by test riding it. You will know: does it make you :)? Otherwise, without trying, there's always a risk. Making a good bike is more than just slinging together a frame and some components, there is an art to it. Plus it's personal - it needs to fit you and suit your intended riding style.
    Inevitably, the above is a simplification (e.g. some rim brakes are better and more expensive than some disc brakes, there are tough bikes with drop bars), but hopefully it gives some idea.

    Kind regards

    - Garry
     
    cctaylor, Spiderous and deebster like this.
  9. Thanks for the replies. Having looked into it I’ll probably go for new at around £500. Already decided I want it to be road based and have ruled out suspension.

    I’ve got a few University visits coming up with my youngest so I suspect it will be a few weeks before I can get out and try some for size.

    Cheers BB
     
  10. Rob998

    Rob998 Scimmia Nordoccidentale

    Do you have access to a Cycle to Work scheme? Saves you your income tax and VAT on a new bike.

    I have a Boardman Comp hybrid, it was reasonably good for £500 about 5 years ago, so things will have moved on since then.
     
  11. James Evans

    James Evans Bedroom Bodger

    Check out facebook marketplace and local for sale groups. I got a pretty much new Cube hybrid for £180 not too long ago (£750 new). Bargains are there to be had and there are millions of 2nd hand bikes out there.
     
  12. glancaster

    glancaster In the silicon vale

    Have you a Decathlon nearby? If so, for your new budget, you could do worse than try one of the Triban RC500's:

    Flat bar version @ £499: https://www.decathlon.co.uk/rc500-flat-bar-disc-road-bike-sora-id_8554412.html
    Drop bar version @ £529: https://www.decathlon.co.uk/triban-rc-500-disc-road-bike-black-sora-id_8554410.html

    There are probably better new bikes for the money about, and certainly some lighter, but most are worse. It's kind of a benchmark.

    Kind regards

    - Garry

    P.S. If buying a bike from Halfords, they regularly have promotions for up to 20% off, plus there's always a 10% discount for Cycling UK members. Don't pay full price there.
     
  13. cctaylor

    cctaylor pfm Member

    Just one point to add Garry's excellent post #8, disc brakes work better in the wet than rim brakes. Until you have cleared the water from the rim you have little braking effort.

    You do get used to anticipating the need to brake and apply the brakes lightly as you approach junctions etc to clear the rims before serious braking. When it's wet you need to allow more distance from the traffic in front.

    Brake blocks can be upgraded to improve wet braking but will need replacing more often.
     
  14. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    There's excellent advice above. My 2p - you have said you want it to be road biased, so that answers a question. Old MTBs are great, I ride one, but a road bike is better on, er, road. You can pick and choose gear ratios, I'd only get a triple if I were touring with gear or lived somewhere really hilly. Brakes, again, you choose. Maybe mechanical discs are a good compromise. Hyd discs are amazing until they start leaking, then they are a costly pain in the arse. Rim brakes are all anyone needs in the dry, but not great in the wet and they trash your rims in maybe 5k miles, especially in wet conditions, the rear faster than the front. If you don't intend to do 5k miles anytime soon and you only have a £50 rear wheel then this last won't matter.
    SH is great if you know exactly what you want, there are great bargai ns to be had, used bikes are hard to give away.
     
  15. After riding a mates Giant at the weekend I pulled the trigger on a Giant Escape 2 Disc 2019 this morning, it's about to be replaced so got it discounted to £329.00. I nipped round to Decathlon yesterday to look at the Triban RC500, I liked it a lot but couldn't get any discount on it.

    Now another question, helmets, I've never used one before but feel the need to get one. I'm a really sweaty bloke when I exercise so want something that won't make me too hot and uncomfortable. Any recommendations?

    Cheers BB
     
  16. glancaster

    glancaster In the silicon vale

    Seems like a good spec for the price. Giant are, I think, the biggest bike manufacturer in the world, so they should know what they are doing, and have advantages of economies of scale.

    No magic solution to that one, but they are generally lighter and better vented now than the earlier helmets.

    There are many online guides as to how to fit a helmet, and it wouldn't hurt to read a couple but, for your first helmet especially, I would say you need the help of a good bike shop. When trying them on, make sure the shop adjusts it to fit, and checks it is secure. Only buy one if it feels comfortable and secure to you. This is important safety equipment, and if it doesn't fit your head shape or is incorrectly adjusted, it may not work as it should in the event of an accident. So, if the shop don't seem to know what they are doing, then go elsewhere.

    Kind regards

    - Garry
     
  17. No magic solution to that one, but they are generally lighter and better vented now than the earlier helmets.

    There are many online guides as to how to fit a helmet, and it wouldn't hurt to read a couple but, for your first helmet especially, I would say you need the help of a good bike shop. When trying them on, make sure the shop adjusts it to fit, and checks it is secure. Only buy one if it feels comfortable and secure to you. This is important safety equipment, and if it doesn't fit your head shape or is incorrectly adjusted, it may not work as it should in the event of an accident. So, if the shop don't seem to know what they are doing, then go elsewhere.

    Kind regards

    - Garry[/QUOTE]

    Cheers Garry, yes it will be a shop purchase, have bought motorbike helmets in the past so know trying a few on is necessary.

    Cheers BB
     
  18. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    Garry's advice re helmets is, again, spot on. Like MC helmets, you will find that you have a Shoei shaped head or an Arai shaped head, and you can go from there. I use a Specialised Align, they are £30 from my LBS and one has saved my life once when a guy in a Toyota Starlet did a SMIDSY and I got a free blue light ride to the LGI, followed by 2 weeks of free food and about a 2 year holiday from work.

    Bike helmet fit is about getting one that doesn't tip backwards off your head if you land on your face, so test for this. The shop will know how.
     
  19. [​IMG]

    New bike arrived yesterday but I only had time for a quick ride around the estate. Went for a ride around some of the local country lanes this evening, I wasn't sure what to expect, I dabbled with a bit of riding 10 years ago but it's 20 years since I last cycled regularly, I'm 51 now. I managed 9.3 miles fairly easily in 51 minutes with 399ft elevation, which was better than I expected.

    Really like the bike, it's smooth and really easy to ride, gear changes are really smooth compared to my old mountain bike and the brakes are great. First time wearing a helmet, I really didn't like it but will persevere, hopefully I'll get used to it. Only downside is I wish it was April rather than September.

    Cheers BB
     
    glancaster likes this.
  20. stevec67

    stevec67 pfm Member

    That looks great. I see it's fitted with the usual chocolate pedals, these will last about 3 weeks or 100 miles, whichever comes first. The best thing that you can say about them is that they let you ride it home from the shop and give you long enough to choose some proper ones. The other thing I'd advise is getting mudguards if you intend using it in winter. Someone else will be along in a minute to tell you to man up and that having dirty, gritty water up your back and trickling between your arse cheeks is the joy of cycling. You choose.
     

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