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So that's the climate f****d then

Discussion in 'off topic' started by avole, Jun 1, 2017.

  1. Marky-Mark

    Marky-Mark pfm Member

    Yeah, I'm committed now to keeping it short. I likely wouldn't read me either.

    It's not many forums that bother with an OT sub. And if they do it often leads to massive defection by flounce, and then the drama people get up in arms over but can't keep their eyes from stops and more people leave.
     
  2. Joe P

    Joe P certified Buffologist / mod

    Marky,

    A bug, and maybe a big one, but it's not a bone.

    Joe
     
  3. Marky-Mark

    Marky-Mark pfm Member

    Just so it isn't that thing you pictured not long ago that looked like Mothra.
     
  4. Joe P

    Joe P certified Buffologist / mod

    Mark,

    Funny you should mention Mothra.

    I spotted a "mothra" (Hyalophora cecropia) a few years ago when I was out running some errands. It was on a parking lot and likely to be run over, so I took it home, where I later took several pictures of it including one of Mothra on my daughter's head, before letting it go that night. They're nocturnal, so flying away during the day was unlikely.

    Anyway, it's huge — the wingspan is nearly seven inches, tip to tip. I'm gonna go out on a limb that that alone precludes it from being up anyone's bum.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Joe
     
    Marky-Mark likes this.
  5. DonQuixote99

    DonQuixote99 pfm Member

    I'm reminded of a thing I have not thought of in decades--saw one of those being carted around in a glass box when I was in kindergarten--one of the school staff had successfully hatched it. Cercropia moth they called it, I remember that (though not the spelling of course). Just another thing in a world full of new things, at that time. Don't recall the bits of lovely orange....
     
  6. Joe P

    Joe P certified Buffologist / mod

    Don,

    It's a fascinating moth. When the adults emerge they live for just a week or two and during that time they have one purpose — finding a mate to start the cycle again. Another interesting thing — the adults don't eat because they can't. They have no digestive system and a non-functioning mouth.

    Cecropia moths aren't endangered, but in a world where climate is changing rapidly I wonder if kids in a 100 years will ever see one. I'm sure we'll have lots of flies, cockroaches and mosquitos, though, so not a complete loss.

    Joe
     
    Mr Cat likes this.
  7. wacko

    wacko pfm Member

    What a beautiful world it would be if humans were cecropia moths.
     
    Mr Cat likes this.
  8. DonQuixote99

    DonQuixote99 pfm Member

    An example of evolution producing pure art.
     
  9. Joe P

    Joe P certified Buffologist / mod

    These are not my pictures, but I like 'em so I'm posting 'em.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    Joe
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2019
  10. wacko

    wacko pfm Member

    I suppose when you only live for a week tops you don't worry too much about predators (birds ? lizards ?). Or does that bright red actually work as camoflage ?
     
  11. Joe P

    Joe P certified Buffologist / mod

    wacko,

    They're nocturnal, so are mostly inactive during the day. In the woods they're much harder to spot.

    [​IMG]

    Joe
     
    Mr Cat likes this.
  12. DonQuixote99

    DonQuixote99 pfm Member

    Hard to say. Human-type larvae might really be hell-on-wheels.
     
  13. avole

    avole The wise never post on Internet forums

    Those are stunning photos, all of them.
     
    Mr Cat likes this.
  14. avole

    avole The wise never post on Internet forums

    Sadly, there is nothing in the capitalist system that can save the planet. OK, the Guardian tries, but this piece of Nero fiddling is typical.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environ...il-spill-nations-history-bulk-carrier-bauxite.

    Apart from the destruction of more species, you would think the spill would be manageable. However, the companies involved are busy washing their hands, so nothing will happen until the courst settle the issue. As it happens, the Australian government is sending help after a request from the islanders, but that isn’t the point.

    Various environmental agencies have been recommending for years that measures be put in place to avoid just what is happening now. Yes, bauxite or whatever will be a lot more expensive, so what? I’d rather paytriple to fly somewhere than have this happen.

    There is a lot more information about this incident onthe web if you search. Personally, I believe the assets of the companies concerned should be seized, the directors jailed for life and the shareholders fined, but ket’s face the truth. The environment makes heart rending news, but our society has never had the will to cope.

    T.S Eliot had it right.
     
  15. avole

    avole The wise never post on Internet forums

    Mr Cat likes this.
  16. Mr Cat

    Mr Cat Owner

    then cats would be our leaders /cloffo mode off
     
  17. dweezil

    dweezil pfm Member

    Agreed.

    It's too easy to leave the problem to insurers; the ship shouldn't even have been allowed to park there.
     
  18. vuk

    vuk \o/ choose anarchy

  19. DonQuixote99

    DonQuixote99 pfm Member

    Whatever the right idea is, I'm pretty sure a vigilante army isn't it. If you try to use violence as a tool to influence policy, you will influence it all right, but not in any good way....
     
  20. DonQuixote99

    DonQuixote99 pfm Member

    I followed the link, followed a link there "to the paper," and found the link there to actually download the paper. At first scan, of both the site where I got the paper and the paper itself, my initial opinion is the creators of this have made a strong, intelligent effort to scare as many readers as possible, as much as possible.

    Open questions:

    1. Is it indeed going to be really bad? Just how really bad, and how soon, really?
    2. Are the authors just trying to give us the bad news as straight up as they can, or are they scaremongering in order to try to get something to happen that they want?
    3. In any case, what is to be done?

    I'm going to give this paper a closer look, first off....

    link to PDF of the paper “Deep Adaptation: A Map for Navigating Climate Tragedy”
     

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